Around Cook County

News and other information from Cook County

"Powerful Tools" Provided for Caregivers

Fri, 03/14/2014 - 6:09pm

It's important for caregivers to develop coping strategies and learn about tools available to take care of themselves.  Care Partners of Cook County will offer "Powerful Tools for Caregivers," a class designed to provide valuable self-care for all caregivers.  Trained instructors, Jeannette Lindgren, Debi LaMusga and Tyler Howell, will teach six classes beginning Thursday, March 20 at the Sawtooth Mountain Clinic.

WTIP volunteer Barb Heideman spoke with Caregiver Coach, Debi LaMusga, about Care Partners of Cook County and the upcoming caregiver training classes.    

Attached file

Sivertson Gallery hosts Inuit Premiere March 14 - 15

Thu, 03/13/2014 - 10:57am

Sivertson Gallery is hosting the 14th Annual Inuit Premiere on March 14 and 15 in Grand Marais.

This year’s Premiere will feature Inuit Stone Carver Looty Pijamini of Grise Fiord, Nunavut; Tom Chapman, president of Upper Canadian Native Art; and throat-singers Nina Segalowitz and Lydia Etok from the North West Territories and Nunavik.

The annual Inuit Premiere is the only one of its kind in the lower 48 United States featuring original Canadian Inuit prints, soapstone carvings and Native Alaskan sculptures formed from walrus tusk, whale bone, baleen and soapstone. The events at Sivertson Gallery are free and open to the public.

Looty Pijamini is an Inuit artist who lives and works in Grise Fiord, Nunavut. He was born on Baffin Island, and began carving at the age of 12. At 15, Pijamini was carving full-time. Looty has been the recipient of many prestigious awards. Gaining inspiration for his work primarily from the stone, Looty claims the stone suggests a subject or idea to him. Looty Pijamini has created many exquisite commissioned sculptures. Recently, he was commissioned to build a monument in recognition of the forced High Arctic Relocation, which took place in 1955. The monument in Grise Fiord, portrays a somber woman with a young boy and husky, looking out to sea. Unveiled in September 2010, the monument received high praise from the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.

Tom Chapman, president of Upper Canada Native Art, Inc. has been involved in the Canadian Inuit arts economy since the early 1980s. Chapman has traveled extensively in the north and is respected in the communities he visits. Tom has been instrumental in helping to create cottage industries, working directly with artists and bringing their products south for sale. He brings great knowledge and fascinating tales to this year’s Inuit Premiere.

"Powerful Tools for Caregivers" to be offered by Care Partners

Thu, 03/13/2014 - 10:56am

Powerful Tools for Caregivers will be offered for six Thursdays beginning March 20 from 5 to 7:30 p.m. This nationally acclaimed class provides valuable self-care for all caregivers. If you are interested please call Care Partners at (218) 387-3787.

Care Partners mission is to enhance end-of-life and palliative (comfort) care and expand services to the frail elderly in Cook County through a community-based approach.

Eat for a Good Cause At Cook County Schools Fundraiser

Thu, 03/13/2014 - 10:09am
The Cook County Education Foundation hosts the 11th Annual ‘Enriching Academics Through Sustenance’ fund raising event.  Better known as ‘E.A.T.S’, the event is Thursday March 13 from 6 to 8pm at the Cook County Middle & High School.  Only 150 tickets will be sold.  Tickets are available at the Java Moose, Blue Water Café and at the Cook County Schools Office.  More information at 387-2271.

Learn more about this Thursday's once-a-year opportunity to eat for a good cause.  
WTIP's Mary Manning spoke with Pat Campanaro and Hal Greenwood of the Cook County Schools Education Foundation about the upcoming food-themed fundraiser.
 

Attached file

West End write-in candidates win seats

Wed, 03/12/2014 - 12:07pm

Elections were held for town clerk and a supervisor in each of the West End townships on Tuesday, March 11. When the votes were tallied, write-in candidates took several seats on town boards.

In Lutsen, incumbent Clerk Silviya Duclos and Supervisor Marland Hansen did not file for re-election.  No one else filed for election during the filing period, so Lutsen voters faced a ballot with two spaces for write-in candidates. Shortly before press time two candidates announced that they were running for supervisor—Andrew Beavers and Colleen Brennan.

Andrew Beavers won the seat.

For clerk, Deputy Clerk Amity Goettl was elected. Goettl had told the News-Herald that she could temporarily fulfill the duties of town clerk.

In Tofte, Clerk Barb Gervais had said she is interested in continuing to serve as town clerk and her name was on the Tofte ballot. She was running unopposed and she was reelected.

Incumbent Supervisor Allan “D.C.” Olsen did not file for re-election and two people ran for that vacant supervisor seat. Judy Motschenbacher filed for election during the filing period and her name was on the ballot with Gervais. Another candidate, Jeanne Larson, announced her intentions to run as a write-in candidate.

The vote was quite close, but after the tally was complete, Larson was the winner and will take a seat on the Tofte town board.

In Schroeder there were no surprises, the incumbent Town Clerk Doug Schwecke and Supervisor Roger “Bill” McKeever were both running for reelection unopposed and both were reelected.

 

North Shore Music Association hosts Anger-Walsh-Gordy Quartet March 15

Wed, 03/12/2014 - 11:58am

The North Shore Music Association will present the Anger-Walsh-Gordy Quartet at the Arrowhead Center for the Arts at 7:30 p.m. March 15.

Legendary fiddler Darol Anger, guitar whiz Grant Gordy, and mandolinist Joe Walsh have all spent their lives moving from place to place, adopting a town and then moving on, toward an intimate knowledge of the physical and psychic terrains that make up the Americas.  Though each is of a different generation, they've walked similar musical paths, exploring the worlds of bluegrass, blues, jazz, and old-time, on their way to mastery of their chosen instruments.

Over the years, they have each become virtuosos of the vast swath of dialects that comprise American roots music. In the ever-stable bassist Karl Doty they found a kindred musical spirit, equally skilled in folk, jazz and classical music, a founding member of one of the premier chamber orchestras in the U.S. Making a musical home for themselves in the space around and between the great American roots styles, this quartet draws from all of their varied backgrounds in crafting a sound all their own, and is drawing all the right kind of attention for their new musical work.

For more information, call the Music Association at (218) 387-1272.