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Updated: 1 hour 39 min ago

What a Find

1 hour 57 min ago

This is quite a story.

Dead, male cougar was found south west of Thunder Bay
#LSN_Outdoors   Mandi Weist hand by Cougar Paw

THUNDER BAY, ONTARIO March 26, 2017  (LSN)My boyfriend, my two friends Casey Nykyforchyn and Istvan Balogh and I, had gone out shooting Saturday afternoon at a gravel pit on the boreal road, south west of Thunder Bay, Ontgario Canada . On the way back, at about 2:00pm, we noticed this van parked on the side of the road at about km 13 on the road. Making sure they were not in any trouble, we had asked them if they were okay. They had told us they were, and that they were just stopped to check out the dead mountain lion on the bank. Being shocked, we had to check it out as well.

We approached the animal and we realized that it was 100% a mountain lion by the colour, the giant teeth and paws, and of course the long tail, lying dead on a patch of snow partially frozen. The cat had porcupine quills in its shoulder and cheek and had looked really thin and starved. Being as it was such a rare find, and had been solid proof that these elusive cats actually do prowl the forests of northwestern Ontario, we couldn’t leave it behind! It would be such an amazing animal to have preserved!

We loaded the cat onto the roof of my jeep and took off to find cell service to call Boreal Tales Taxidermy and find out what exactly can be done with the animal (keeping in mind that we would also have to notify the MNR). The taxidermist’s, Dan and Robin, had been almost in denial that we indeed had possession of the great elusive mountain lion! They had also told us we were to fill out a couple forms online to report the cat and receive a confirmation number, which I had done right away.

We finally arrived at the taxidermist’s house where they took the animal and our confirmation number to being the preservation.

After speaking with Dan over the phone a while later, he had the animal skinned and informed us that it was an adult male, and the animal had no quills in it’s mouth, but however had been just skin and bone, having also suffered from muscle atrophy, meaning the poor cat had not had a very pleasant end of it’s life. It was also found out the cat’s stomach and intestines had been completely empty, suggesting that it had died from natural causes.

The next day just after noon, I had received a phone call from a Conservation officer, Rick Leblanc, wanting to meet up so I can show him exactly where the animal was found. Upon meeting him, he told me mountain lions are an endangered species in Ontario and being in possession of one is illegal. He said the ministry is confiscating the cat, but is still continuing the preservation process, getting the animal stuffed and is going to be on display for educational purposes. He had also told me that this find is the very first confirmed carcass of a mountain lion in Ontario in all of history.
  In the end, I was bummed that I could not keep the beautiful animal, but it still is nice that the cat will be preserved and put on display where many people can see and learn about it. It was an amazing experience and I am glad I was able to be a part of it, as it is a big point in history for Ontario wildlife. Sincerely,
Amanda Weist

Photos and story by Manda Weist

 

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Looks Like Fun

Tue, 03/28/2017 - 6:04am
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The Spawn Won’t Be Long

Mon, 03/27/2017 - 4:22pm

With the warm temperatures and melting snow we might see an earlier than normal fish spawn. Then again, we might not!

 

MN  DNR Question of the week
Q: Which fish species are the first to spawn in Minnesota lakes during the spring?

A: Northern pike usually spawn first when water temperatures are in the low 40s. There is often still ice on the main lakes when pike run into tributary streams, rivers or wetlands to spawn. Walleye spawn a bit later, followed by yellow perch, muskellunge, bass and crappie/bluegill.

Henry Drewes, DNR regional fisheries manager

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Bear Aware in the Spring

Sun, 03/26/2017 - 4:55pm

Here’s some helpful tips from the MN DNR!

Be aware of bears this spring; DNR lists tips for avoiding conflicts
Anyone living near bear habitat is reminded to be aware of bears this spring and check their property for food sources that could attract bears.

“Leaving food out in yards that can be eaten by bears can lead to property damage and presents dangers to bears,” said Eric Nelson, wildlife animal damage program supervisor for the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. “Pet food, livestock feed, birdseed, compost or garbage can attract bears.”

As bears emerge from hibernation, their metabolism gradually ramps up and they will begin looking for food at a time when berries and green vegetation can be scarce.

Only black bears live in the wild in Minnesota. They usually are shy and flee when encountered. Never approach or try to pet a bear. Injury to people is rare, but bears are potentially dangerous because of their size, strength and speed.

The DNR does not relocate problem bears. Relocated bears seldom remain where they are released. They may return to where they were caught or become a problem somewhere else.

The DNR offers some tips for avoiding bear conflicts.

Around the yard

Do not leave food from barbeques and picnics outdoors, especially overnight. Coolers are not bear-proof.
Replace hummingbird feeders with hanging flower baskets, which are also attractive to hummingbirds.
Eliminate birdfeeders or hang them 10 feet up and 4 feet out from the nearest trees.
Use a rope and pulley system to refill birdfeeders, and clean up spilled seeds. Where bears are a nuisance, birdfeeders should be taken down between now and Dec. 1.
Store pet food inside and feed pets inside. If pets must be fed outdoors, feed them only as much as they will eat.
Clean and store barbeque grills after each use. Store them in a secure shed or garage away from windows and doors.
Pick fruit from trees as soon as it’s ripe, and collect fallen fruit immediately.
Limit compost piles to grass, leaves and garden clippings, and turn piles regularly. Do not add food scraps.
Harvest garden produce as it matures. Locate gardens away from forests and shrubs that bears may use for cover.
Use native plants in landscaping whenever possible. Clover and dandelions will attract bears.
Elevate bee hives on bear-proof platforms or erect properly designed electric fences.
Do not put out feed for wildlife (like corn, oats, pellets or molasses blocks).
Garbage

Store garbage in bear-resistant garbage cans or dumpsters. Rubber or plastic garbage cans are not bear-proof.
Keep garbage inside a secure building until the morning of pickup.
Properly rinse all recyclable containers with hot water to remove all remaining product.
Store recyclable containers, such as pop cans, inside.
Store garbage that can become smelly, such as meat or fish scraps, in a freezer until it can be taken to a refuse site or picked up by refuse collector.
Take especially smelly or rotting garbage as soon as possible to your local refuse facility so it can be buried.
People should always be cautious around bears. If they have persistent bear problems after cleaning up the food sources, they should contact a DNR area wildlife office for assistance. For the name of the local wildlife manager, contact the DNR Information Center at 651-296-6157 or 888-646-6367, or visit mndnr.gov/contact/locator.html.

For more information, visit mndnr.gov/livingwith_wildlife/bears.

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Three Month Solo in the BWCA

Sat, 03/25/2017 - 10:27am

Sound like fun to you? How about in the winter?

From Quetico Superior Wilderness-

A young man named Jon White recently spent three months alone in the wilderness, paddling in on November 1 and pulling a handmade toboggan out over frozen lakes at the end of January. He did the whole thing without a food resupply, and went two-and-a-half months without seeing another person.

White camped on Knife Lake and explored the surrounding area on snowshoes, using traditional techniques and gear. He tested his “bushcraft” skills by sleeping outside in -35 degrees F and leaping into the water through a hole in the ice during sub-zero temperatures.

And he recorded all of it. Starting on January 31, White has released a total of five videos.

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Hammock Craft

Fri, 03/24/2017 - 3:21pm

While I don’t think I’m going to help them fund this device I do think it is a neat idea.  It would be great fun to be able to lie in a hammock over the water! It would be nice for car camping since you wouldn’t have to worry about finding enough sturdy trees for everyone in your group to put their hammock up. Check it out-

This is Hammocraft.

The Hammocraft has evolved from half a dozen different designs that we tested, tweaked, and tampered with over a period of 10 years. The Hammocraft is designed to sling up to 5 hammocks atop paddle boards, river rafts, kayaks, and even on dry land…essentially wherever or whatever you dream up as a hammock dock.

The Specs

The Hammocraft frame comes with:

  • High-quality aluminum poles (6061 T6 clear anodized aluminum)
  • Stainless steel corners (304 stainless steel corners with black UV resistant powdercoating)
  • Quick connecting spring clips (304 stainless steel spring clips) for easy setup and take down
  • Four Hammocraft nylon webbing straps with zinc plated cam buckles for attaching the frame to your floatable of choice
  • A carrying case for your Hammocraft frame

 

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Winter Adventure at Menogyn

Thu, 03/23/2017 - 10:28am

What an amazing opportunity for these youth to experience the BWCA and winter on the Gunflint Trail. Through Wilderness Inquiry and Camp Menogyn a group of Somali-Minnesotan boys get to experience winter on the edge of the BWCA.  Read the full story here.

Here’s an excerpt-

More than 300 miles north of the Twin Cities, a group of 11 Somali-Minnesotan boys, ages 7 to 14 years old, arrives in an expansive forest within the Boundary Waters. Cell phone signals drop, and the boys breathe collective sighs of discontent. The van parks at the edge of Bearskin Lake, one of 1,175 in the Boundary Waters that are now frozen solid, making the area less of a boundary and more of a bridge.

Building bridges is what has brought them up here in the first place. The group includes four guides from Wilderness Inquiry—a nearly 40-year-old, Minneapolis-based nonprofit dedicated to making the outdoors accessible for all, including people with disabilities and underserved youth—and two leaders from Ka Joog, a Somali youth advocacy group.

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Summer is Coming

Wed, 03/22/2017 - 9:50pm

It will be awhile yet but before long we’ll have open water for paddling again. Get your trip dates on the calendar, I know I’ve got mine!

BWCA Bliss

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Shakespeare on the Shore in Grand Marais

Tue, 03/21/2017 - 7:31am

Any Shakespeare aficionados out there? We’re trying to find out and we’re hosting a Shakespeare Festival at Voyageur Brewing Company this weekend. If you’re looking for a weekend escape, then come on up for a visit!

Voyageur Brewing Company Presents Shakespeare on the Shore

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Happy Spring!

Mon, 03/20/2017 - 7:54pm

Hoping your spring is off to a great start!

Here’s a great catch photo of Matt’s!

Matt’s great catch

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Ice Fishing Success in the BWCA

Sun, 03/19/2017 - 12:19pm

Some guests of Voyageur had some good fishing the other weekend. Fun times in the Boundary Waters!

Ice Fishing in the BWCA

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Granite River BWCA Canoe Route

Sat, 03/18/2017 - 11:14am

Thinking about paddling the Granite River this summer? Here’s some information from our website we thought we’d share with you.

The Granite River trip is one of our all-time favorites at Voyageur Canoe Outfitters. The route straddles the border between Canada and the US so you’ll find yourself alternating between the two as there is not a line or fence between the two countries.
The Granite River is a section of the larger Voyageurs route traveled years ago. You can picture the Voyageurs paddling among the pines and portaging their gear through the woods as you travel this scenic route.

The word “river” conjures up different things in different people’s mind.  If you’re thinking of floating along with the current and barely paddling then get that out of your mind. The Granite River has lakes interconnected by rapids that are for the most part non-navigable.  You’ll be portaging around the rapids and paddling to propel yourself onward.

We’ve paddled the entire Granite River in a day but it’s not something we recommend.  It’s nice to have a minimum of three or four days to paddle and camp this route.  If you plan to fish then you’ll definitely want to spend more days so you can take advantage of the great fishing for walleye, smallmouth bass and northern pike.  Some folks call this an easy beginners route but I have a difficult time calling it that with the number of portages there are.

The trip can be paddled beginning in the south or the north. Because the current is mainly located near the portages it doesn’t require much more effort to paddle against the current.  Most people begin the trip by getting dropped off or parking at the public landing on Gunflint Lake. From our location it’s just a quick 15-minute drive to get to Gunflint Lake. From there it’s just a short paddle into Magnetic Lake, the actual entry point into the Boundary Waters Canoe Area.  You’ll need to paddle, fish and camp in Minnesota unless you obtain proper permits to enter Canada.

Paddling on Magnetic Lake you’ll see a beautiful Swiss Chalet looking house on an island. This is a summer cabin and is known as Gallagher’s Island. The waterway past this is sometimes referred to as the Pine River. The waterway will narrow until you reach the 5-rod portage around Little Rock Falls.  This is a photo opportunity for sure.

There’s a 30-rod portage called Wood Horse Portage into the next section of the Pine River where you’ll find the first campsite. If this is taken you’ll need to continue paddling until you reach the 100-rod Pine Portage into Clove Lake where there are three campsites to choose from.

To the west of Clove Lake is a portage into Larch Lake. At one time Larch Lake was a beautiful place to camp especially the island campsite. Unfortunately fire and high winds have eliminated most of the towering pines but you can still camp there and enjoy the solitude of the small lake. You can also spend some time exploring the area during a day trip, just be sure to remember to bring your fishing rod along.
Paddling out of Clove Lake you’ll find a 48-rod portage into Granite Lake and the beginning of the actual Granite River. The majority of Granite Lake is in Canada so you won’t spend much time paddling before you reach the next portage known as Swamp Portage.

The name aptly describes this 72-rod portage as much of the time you’ll find knee-deep muck somewhere along the path. Tighten your footwear prior to this portage because the suction power of the muck is enough to pull a strapped tight Chaco off of a foot and swallow it whole never to be seen again.
This is known as Granite Bay where you’ll paddle to a 25-rod portage known as Granite River Portage.  Another quick paddle and you’ll be at the 25-rod Gneiss Lake Portage that takes you into Gneiss Lake. Be sure to keep your fishing rod handy in this section of the river because there can be good fishing at the rapids.

The area of Gneiss Lake and Maraboeuf is sometimes referred to as the  “Devil’s Elbow.” Unlike Swamp Portage the name does not come from a man wearing red carrying a pitchfork here.  So feel free to camp at any of the campsites, just remember if you have a BWCA permit you need to stay on the US side where there are 15 to choose from in this large area.

There is a 25-rod portage that eliminates paddling past many of the campsites on Maraboeuf if you are looking to avoid a little paddling perhaps in pursuit of a certain fishing area.
After the long stretch of paddling you’ll find the 27-rod portage around Horsetail Rapids. It’s on the Canadian side of the river and can sometimes be tricky due to the water level. Just don’t convince yourself that it would be easier to paddle through the rapids than to portage. Others have thought this and left their canoes wrapped around rocks in the river.

Another quick paddle and you’ll be at Saganaga Falls.  Again, don’t be fooled by the looks of the falls. Take the 34-rod portage around the falls.  There’s a reason artifacts from the days of the Voyageurs have been found at the bottom of the falls and it isn’t because they were thrown into the water on purpose.

From this point you can decide whether or not you will paddle Saganaga Lake back to our base on the Seagull River or get picked up by a towboat.  It’s a beautiful paddle if the wind and waves are cooperative but it does add a few hours onto your trip.  But if you’re like me, then you’re never ready for a BWCA trip to end.

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Boundary Waters Loop Saganaga, Knife & Seagull

Fri, 03/17/2017 - 11:01am

The best part about the location of Voyageur Canoe Outfitters is the vast number of Boundary Waters and Quetico Park canoe trips that can be taken leaving right from our dock. One of our favorite said routes is the Saganaga, Knife and Seagull Lakes loop. There are a number of variations of this route depending upon how many days you have but believe me, you’re sure to enjoy this loop no matter what detours you choose to take along the way.

Saganaga Lake

You can read about Saganaga and Seagull Lakes on our other trip route descriptions in full detail. For sake of brevity we’ll keep the information about those two lakes to a minimum on this route description.

This route can be done with either a Saganaga Lake permit or a Seagull Lake Permit. Since we prefer to use a tow boat to get us to American Point on Saganaga we’ll describe this route beginning from there.

American Point is as far north and west as motorboats are allowed to travel into the BWCA. From there it’s paddle power only as you make your way west along the Minnesota Canadian border.

There are a number of great campsites to choose from in this area that require no portaging to access. If you’re getting a late start in the day or want to spend some time fishing then locate one of these jewels.

The paddle from American Point to the first 5-rod portage into Swamp Lake is relatively short but very scenic. After paddling past the opening to Cache Bay of the Quetico Park the waterway begins to narrow. It eventually funnels down to an intimate stream like size as you straddle the narrow waterway with the bow of your canoe in the US and the stern in Canada. The waterway opens up again before the 3rd Bay of Saganaga where you can find a 5-rod portage into Zephyr Lake or continue along the route to Ottertrack Lake.

In high water we’ve paddled through the 5-rod portage into Swamp Lake but that has been a very rare occasion. Most of the time you need to unload your canoe and portage the short expanse of land. The paddle across Swamp Lake is a short one and before you get to the portage to Ottertrack Lake you’ll see the decking of the Monument Portage. This is a relatively easy 80-rod portage as it is quite wide due to the maintenance of the International Border. You’ll see why the portage is called Monument as you make your way to Ottertrack.

canoeing the BWCA

The bay of Ottertrack where the portage leads to is shallow and sandy. I love this area because you can see to the bottom and one time I was able to spy a beaver swimming beneath my canoe. The lake begins to open up and this is where you would find the portage into Ester Lake and one campsite before you reach the narrow passageway into the rest of Ottertrack Lake. This section of Ottertrack is lined by high cliffs on the Canadian side of the lake. It’s quite majestic looking and I’m always in awe when I paddle past. It’s a beautiful long and narrow lake with most campsites located at the opposite end of the lake. You’ll find one campsite on a point right after the portage into Gijikiki Lake. Then there are three campsites before the lake funnels around a bend toward the 5-rod portage into Knife Lake.

After the quick lift over you might want to spend some time fishing in the bay above the falls and below the falls. There’s a campsite right around the corner you could enjoy a break at if no one has set up camp there.

Knife Lake is a long, large lake that also straddles Canada and the US. There are islands, fingers and many bays to explore on this expansive and scenic lake. For the least amount of portaging you’ll paddle past a number of bays and campsites until you reach Thunder Point. There is a hiking trail to the top of Thunder Point and you can see down the rest of the expanse of Knife Lake from this vantage point.

The South Arm of Knife is narrower and there are again a large number of campsites to choose from as you paddle east toward the 25-rod portage to Eddy Lake. Eddy Lake is tiny and has just one campsite on the west end of the lake. The next portage is a 15-rod into Jenny Lake that has two campsites to choose from but if you really want seclusion then take the 20-rod portage into Calico Lake where you’ll find a campsite seldom seen by others. A 15-rod portage takes you into and out of tiny but beautiful Annie Lake into Ogishkemuncie Lake.

Ogish is a great place to camp due to the many day trip options it provides. Those who are interested in hiking will find the Kekekabic Trail by taking the 103-rod portage into Mueller then trekking on the 112-rod portage to Agamok. The most photographed bridge in the Boundary Waters is located on this portage thanks to the existence of the Kekekabic Trail that connects the East end of the BWCA(Gunflint Trail) to the West end of the BWCA(Snowbank Lake Area). The water cascades beneath the bridge as it makes its way from Agamok down to Mueller in a picturesque waterfall. The trail provides welcome relief to legs that have been cramped in a canoe for days.

While camping on Ogish one can explore Skindance Lake by taking the 22-rod portage from Ogish or explore Spice Lake to the North by traversing the quick 10-rod portage from Ogish. Both of these lakes have campsites, privacy from paddlers on Ogish and have fishing for northern pike and smallmouth bass.

All four species of fish are available in Ogish including walleye, northern pike, smallmouth bass and lake trout. The many bays and islands provide great fishing and beautiful scenery just a day’s paddle from Seagull Lake.

At the east end of the lake you’ll find the 38-rod portage into Kingfisher which has no campsites. It’s a fast paddle to the opposite side of the lake where the 25-rod portage into Jasper can be found. Jasper has six campsites to choose from and since the Cavity Lake Fire of 2006 they are usually open. It was one of the hardest hit lakes during this forest fire and regeneration has been slower here than other places in the BWCA. It’s a private lake and tends to be super quiet too.

A 45-rod portage leads into Alpine Lake. Alpine is a favorite lake of many because there are a number of hidden bays and islands where 21 campsites await. A 105-rod portage leads into Seagull Lake where you can either exit or take one more portage into the Seagull River and back to Voyageur Canoe Outfitters.

 

 

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Cute Cross Fox

Thu, 03/16/2017 - 5:15pm

It’s been awhile since I’ve seen a cross fox at Voyageur but a neighbor was lucky enough to have one visit. So cute! Thanks for sharing the photos Jim.

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Eagle Update

Wed, 03/15/2017 - 5:15pm

I’ve seen quite a few bald eagles on the North Shore lately.

Feed me, feed me!
Update from the nest

Our three eaglets are now focused on the business of growing up, eating plenty and getting strong. They’re a full-time job for the adult eagles, in need of frequent feedings and help staying warm, but these adults have proved their mettle as parents. Fish, pigeons, muskrat and squirrel have all made appearances at meal times, and both adults are taking turns keeping the chicks protected from the March winds of Minnesota.

Sibling squabbles

Competition starts early in the life of a bald eagle. As we’ve seen, bald eagle chicks hatch asynchronously, meaning they don’t all hatch at the same time. A few days difference in age means differences in size and strength for the first weeks of their lives outside the shell, resulting in sibling rivalry. At this young age, one eaglet is unlikely to really hurt another, but that doesn’t keep them from trying! Viewers may see tiny grey heads bashing each other during feeding times. This behavior is a normal and healthy part of early life for an eaglet. Working to get to the best food bits first, to have the most comfy spot in the nest and the most parental attention helps eaglets grow strong and smart. Eagles’ lives don’t get easier once they fledge and join the adult population, so it’s very important they develop a competitive spirit early on.

Parental strategies

Parenting human children, someone once said, is like making chili; everyone has their own recipe. That’s true in the animal kingdom, too, where biologists describe two basic approaches to caring for the young. Some species are referred to as precocial – their young are mobile and pretty much able to take care of themselves as soon as they’re born or hatched (what parents of any teenager might occasionally find themselves longing for). Horses, giraffes, domestic chickens, ducks and turkeys – all are precocial. The super-precocial African wildebeest has calves that can stand within six minutes of birth, and outrun their main predator, the hyena, within a day, giving them a significant survival advantage.

Other species are altricial – they need lots of care and feeding for at least a while after being born or hatched. Most backyard songbirds are altricial, as are eagles and other raptors. That’s why we get to be intimate witnesses to all that goes on in our bald eagles’ nest. If eagles were precocial, they’d fly off shortly after being hatched, and there wouldn’t be much to see.

Altricial development may offer benefits to the species, as well as to us spectators. Altricial birds, like eagles, hatch with fairly small brains, but the rich parent-provided diet after hatching lets their brains grow larger and more complex than precocial birds, providing advantages for survival. It certainly seems to work that way for humans. Altricial development also tends to promote greater socialization, as parents may need to work together to provide care for their young. Certainly we see that with our bald eagle pair!

While humans may be at one end of the altricial development scale, taking as much as 18 years for the young to become mature (sometimes more – much more!), such traits are not confined to higher order critters. Some insects such as ants and bees also can be categorized as altricial. One fascinating group of beetles, known as burying beetles, displays a surprising amount of parental care. True to their name, burying beetles chew up and bury the bodies of small animals as food for their larvae. Both parents then guard the larvae and the carcass/food from other intrusions, and they will feed the squiggling larvae a regurgitated liquid protein in response to begging. It is particularly noteworthy that male burying beetles participate in parental care alongside the females. Although the burying beetle larvae are capable of moving about and feeding on their own, the parental care shown by burying beetles is thought to produce fewer but larger and stronger adults.

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