Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - February 17 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Tue, 02/17/2015 - 7:18pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - February 17

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Tue, 02/17/2015 - 7:18pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Solitaire
   Simple version of the classic card game.
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Zach Braff

Quotes of the Day - Tue, 02/17/2015 - 6:00pm
"I'm kind of jealous of the life I'm supposedly leading."
Categories: Fun Stuff

John le Carre

Quotes of the Day - Tue, 02/17/2015 - 6:00pm
"Coming home from very lonely places, all of us go a little mad: whether from great personal success, or just an all-night drive, we are the sole survivors of a world no one else has ever seen."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

Quotes of the Day - Tue, 02/17/2015 - 6:00pm
"The intelligent man finds almost everything ridiculous, the sensible man hardly anything."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Carl Sandburg

Quotes of the Day - Tue, 02/17/2015 - 6:00pm
"I'm an idealist. I don't know where I'm going, but I'm on my way."
Categories: Fun Stuff

superfluous

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Tue, 02/17/2015 - 12:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for February 17, 2015 is:

superfluous • \soo-PER-floo-us\  • adjective
1 : exceeding what is sufficient or necessary : extra 2 : not needed : unnecessary

Examples:
The textbook includes so much superfluous information that students often overlook key points.

"Music director Anu Tali's clear direction, free of superfluous gestures, embodied the elegance that shone through, particularly in the increasingly polished blend of string sound that the orchestra has been producing." — Gayle Williams, Sarasota (Florida) Herald Tribune, January 11, 2015

Did you know?
If you think that superfluous must mean "extra 'fluous,'" along the pattern of such words as superabsorbent and superabundant, you're not far off. Superfluous comes from the Latin adjective superfluus, meaning literally "running over" or "overflowing." Superfluus, in turn, derives from the combination of the prefix super- (meaning "over" or "more") and fluere, "to flow." (Fluere also gave us fluid, fluent, and influence, among others.) Since its first appearance in English in the 15th century, superfluous has referred to an "overflowing" of some supply, as of time or words, which hearkens back to its Latin origins.

Categories: Fun Stuff

February 17, 1904: Madame Butterfly premieres

This Day in History - Mon, 02/16/2015 - 11:00pm

On this day in 1904, Giacomo Puccini's opera Madame Butterfly premieres at the La Scala theatre in Milan, Italy.

The young Puccini decided to dedicate his life to opera after seeing a performance of Giuseppe Verdi's Aida in 1876. In his later life, he would write some of the best-loved operas of all time: La Boheme (1896), Tosca (1900), Madame Butterfly (1904) and Turandot (left unfinished when he died in 1906). Not one of these, however, was an immediate success when it opened. La Boheme, the now-classic story of a group of poor artists living in a Paris garret, earned mixed reviews, while Tosca was downright panned by critics.

While supervising a production of Tosca in London, Puccini saw the play Madame Butterfly, written by David Belasco and based on a story by John Luther Long. Taken with the strong female character at its center, he began working on an operatic version of the play, with an Italian libretto by Giuseppe Giacosa and Luigi Illica. Written over the course of two years--including an eight-month break when Puccini was badly injured in a car accident--the opera made its debut in Milan in February 1904.

Set in Nagasaki, Japan, Madame Butterfly told the story of an American sailor, B.F. Pinkerton, who marries and abandons a young Japanese geisha, Cio-Cio-San, or Madame Butterfly. In addition to the rich, colorful orchestration and powerful arias that Puccini was known for, the opera reflected his common theme of living and dying for love. This theme often played out in the lives of his heroines--women like Cio-Cio-San, who live for the sake of their lovers and are eventually destroyed by the pain inflicted by that love. Perhaps because of the opera's foreign setting or perhaps because it was too similar to Puccini's earlier works, the audience at the premiere reacted badly to Madame Butterfly, hissing and yelling at the stage. Puccini withdrew it after one performance. He worked quickly to revise the work, splitting the 90-minute-long second act into two parts and changing other minor aspects. Four months later, the revamped Madame Butterfly went onstage at the Teatro Grande in Brescia. This time, the public greeted the opera with tumultuous applause and repeated encores, and Puccini was called before the curtain 10 times. Madame Butterfly went on to huge international success, moving to New York's Metropolitan Opera in 1907. 

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - February 16

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Mon, 02/16/2015 - 7:04pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

In each case, can you replace the missing number, which appears as a word. For example, one, two, etc.

This sentence contains exactly ==?== E's and not one more.

However, this sentence contains exactly ==?== S's, with a single Z.

Finally, to finish, this sentence has exactly ==?== I's.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - February 16 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Mon, 02/16/2015 - 7:04pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - February 16

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Mon, 02/16/2015 - 7:04pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Carnival Jackpot
   Fast pace 'line-them-up' game.
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Edward Abbey

Quotes of the Day - Mon, 02/16/2015 - 6:00pm
"One man alone can be pretty dumb sometimes, but for real bona fide stupidity, there ain't nothin' can beat teamwork."
Categories: Fun Stuff

P. J. O'Rourke

Quotes of the Day - Mon, 02/16/2015 - 6:00pm
"Skiing consists of wearing $3,000 worth of clothes and equipment and driving 200 miles in the snow in order to stand around at a bar and drink."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Herbert Rappaport

Quotes of the Day - Mon, 02/16/2015 - 6:00pm
"I hope that while so many people are out smelling the flowers, someone is taking the time to plant some."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Steven Wright

Quotes of the Day - Mon, 02/16/2015 - 6:00pm
"What's another word for Thesaurus?"
Categories: Fun Stuff

deflagrate

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Mon, 02/16/2015 - 12:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for February 16, 2015 is:

deflagrate • \DEF-luh-grayt\  • verb
1 : to burn rapidly with intense heat and sparks being given off 2 : to cause to burn in such a manner

Examples:
The city has banned fireworks and similar devices that deflagrate when lit.

"'It wasn't a pipe bomb, it was a destructive device,' [Gage County Chief Deputy] Klaus said. 'It was poorly constructed and it actually just deflagrated, it didn't explode. It just burned at a rapid rate.'" — Luke Nichols, Beatrice (Nebraska) Daily Sun, June 9, 2010

Did you know?
Deflagrate combines the Latin verb flagrare, meaning "to burn," with the Latin prefix de-, meaning "down" or "away." Flagrare is also an ancestor of such words as conflagration and flagrant and is distantly related to fulgent and flame. In the field of explosives, deflagrate is used to describe the burning of fuel accelerated by the expansion of gasses under the pressure of containment, which causes the containing vessel to break apart. In comparison, the term detonate (from the Latin tonare, meaning "to thunder") refers to an instant, violent explosion that results when shock waves pass through molecules and displace them at supersonic speed. Deflagrate has been making sparks in English since about 1727, and detonate burst onto the scene a couple of years later.

Categories: Fun Stuff

February 16, 1923: Archaeologist opens tomb of King Tut

This Day in History - Sun, 02/15/2015 - 11:00pm

On this day in 1923, in Thebes, Egypt, English archaeologist Howard Carter enters the sealed burial chamber of the ancient Egyptian ruler King Tutankhamen.

Because the ancient Egyptians saw their pharaohs as gods, they carefully preserved their bodies after death, burying them in elaborate tombs containing rich treasures to accompany the rulers into the afterlife. In the 19th century, archeologists from all over the world flocked to Egypt, where they uncovered a number of these tombs. Many had long ago been broken into by robbers and stripped of their riches.

When Carter arrived in Egypt in 1891, he became convinced there was at least one undiscovered tomb--that of the little known Tutankhamen, or King Tut, who lived around 1400 B.C. and died when he was still a teenager. Backed by a rich Brit, Lord Carnarvon, Carter searched for five years without success. In early 1922, Lord Carnarvon wanted to call off the search, but Carter convinced him to hold on one more year. 

In November 1922, the wait paid off, when Carter's team found steps hidden in the debris near the entrance of another tomb. The steps led to an ancient sealed doorway bearing the name Tutankhamen. When Carter and Lord Carnarvon entered the tomb's interior chambers on November 26, they were thrilled to find it virtually intact, with its treasures untouched after more than 3,000 years. The men began exploring the four rooms of the tomb, and on February 16, 1923, under the watchful eyes of a number of important officials, Carter opened the door to the last chamber.

Inside lay a sarcophagus with three coffins nested inside one another. The last coffin, made of solid gold, contained the mummified body of King Tut. Among the riches found in the tomb--golden shrines, jewelry, statues, a chariot, weapons, clothing--the perfectly preserved mummy was the most valuable, as it was the first one ever to be discovered. Despite rumors that a curse would befall anyone who disturbed the tomb, its treasures were carefully catalogued, removed and included in a famous traveling exhibition called the "Treasures of Tutankhamen." The exhibition's permanent home is the Egyptian Museum in Cairo.  

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - February 15

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sun, 02/15/2015 - 6:50pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

A local grocer delivers lemonade using two full 10 pint jugs.

Recently, the grocer delivered to a pair of customers who had a five pint jug and a four pint jug between them.

Each wanted two pints of lemonade though.

How did the grocer measure two pints into each jug only using the two 10 pint jugs and the customers' jugs?

The jugs are not marked in any way and there was no other container which could be used.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - February 15 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sun, 02/15/2015 - 6:50pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - February 15

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sun, 02/15/2015 - 6:50pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Murfy Maths
   Complete maths puzzles against the clock in this addictive puzzle game.
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff