Fun Stuff

William Feather

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 07/19/2014 - 7:00pm
"The petty economies of the rich are just as amazing as the silly extravagances of the poor."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Samuel Butler

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 07/19/2014 - 7:00pm
"Life is like playing a violin in public and learning the instrument as one goes on."
Categories: Fun Stuff

M. Cartmill

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 07/19/2014 - 7:00pm
"As an adolescent I aspired to lasting fame, I craved factual certainty, and I thirsted for a meaningful vision of human life - so I became a scientist. This is like becoming an archbishop so you can meet girls."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Paula Poundstone

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 07/19/2014 - 7:00pm
"I don't have a bank account, because I don't know my mother's maiden name."
Categories: Fun Stuff

blandish

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Sat, 07/19/2014 - 1:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for July 19, 2014 is:

blandish • \BLAN-dish\  • verb
1 : to coax or persuade with flattery : cajole 2 : to act or speak in a flattering or coaxing manner

Examples:
Some of Tim's coworkers even managed to blandish him into doing their work for them by complimenting him shamelessly.

"Glennan believed a presidential statement would help to gain initiative against Congress and the media, and he repeatedly blandished Eisenhower to make a greater public relations effort." — Yanek Mieczkowski, Eisenhower's Sputnik Moment, 2013

Did you know?
The word "blandish" has been a part of the English language since at least the 14th century with virtually no change in its meaning. It ultimately derives from "blandus," a Latin word meaning "mild" or "flattering." One of the earliest known uses of "blandish" can be found in the sacred writings of Richard Rolle de Hampole, an English hermit and mystic, who cautioned against "the dragon that blandishes with the head and smites with the tail." Although "blandish" might not exactly be suggestive of dullness, it was the "mild" sense of "blandus" that gave us our adjective "bland," which has a lesser-known sense meaning "smooth and soothing in manner or quality."

Categories: Fun Stuff

July 19, 1799: Rosetta Stone found

This Day in History - Fri, 07/18/2014 - 11:00pm

On this day in 1799, during Napoleon Bonaparte's Egyptian campaign, a French soldier discovers a black basalt slab inscribed with ancient writing near the town of Rosetta, about 35 miles north of Alexandria. The irregularly shaped stone contained fragments of passages written in three different scripts: Greek, Egyptian hieroglyphics and Egyptian demotic. The ancient Greek on the Rosetta Stone told archaeologists that it was inscribed by priests honoring the king of Egypt, Ptolemy V, in the second century B.C. More startlingly, the Greek passage announced that the three scripts were all of identical meaning. The artifact thus held the key to solving the riddle of hieroglyphics, a written language that had been "dead" for nearly 2,000 years.

When Napoleon, an emperor known for his enlightened view of education, art and culture, invaded Egypt in 1798, he took along a group of scholars and told them to seize all important cultural artifacts for France. Pierre Bouchard, one of Napoleon's soldiers, was aware of this order when he found the basalt stone, which was almost four feet long and two-and-a-half feet wide, at a fort near Rosetta. When the British defeated Napoleon in 1801, they took possession of the Rosetta Stone.

Several scholars, including Englishman Thomas Young made progress with the initial hieroglyphics analysis of the Rosetta Stone. French Egyptologist Jean-Francois Champollion (1790-1832), who had taught himself ancient languages, ultimately cracked the code and deciphered the hieroglyphics using his knowledge of Greek as a guide. Hieroglyphics used pictures to represent objects, sounds and groups of sounds. Once the Rosetta Stone inscriptions were translated, the language and culture of ancient Egypt was suddenly open to scientists as never before.

The Rosetta Stone has been housed at the British Museum in London since 1802, except for a brief period during World War I. At that time, museum officials moved it to a separate underground location, along with other irreplaceable items from the museum's collection, to protect it from the threat of bombs.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - July 18

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Fri, 07/18/2014 - 9:06pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

Are there more square inches in a piece of carpet 15 yards by 5 yards or feet in a 20 mile walk?

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - July 18 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Fri, 07/18/2014 - 9:06pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - July 18

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Fri, 07/18/2014 - 9:06pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Ping
   A curious game played vertically and horizontally at the same time.
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

John Green

Quotes of the Day - Fri, 07/18/2014 - 7:00pm
"The United States Congress, like a lot of rich people, lives in two houses."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Robertson Davies

Quotes of the Day - Fri, 07/18/2014 - 7:00pm
"To be a book-collector is to combine the worst characteristics of a dope fiend with those of a miser."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Albert Einstein

Quotes of the Day - Fri, 07/18/2014 - 7:00pm
"Yes, we have to divide up our time like that, between our politics and our equations. But to me our equations are far more important, for politics are only a matter of present concern. A mathematical equation stands forever."
Categories: Fun Stuff

William Blake

Quotes of the Day - Fri, 07/18/2014 - 7:00pm
"It is easier to forgive an enemy than to forgive a friend."
Categories: Fun Stuff

lèse-majesté

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Fri, 07/18/2014 - 1:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for July 18, 2014 is:

lèse-majesté • \layz-MAJ-uh-stee\  • noun
1 : an offense violating the dignity of sovereign 2 : a detraction from or affront to dignity or importance

Examples:
"That kind of suppression actually harkens back … to the 1976 coup, when the penalty for lèse majesté was increased to a maximum of 15 years in prison per count.…" —David Streckfuss, Vice News, June 3, 2014

"You can look it up, but every man who beat Roger Federer this year lost his next match. Maybe there is a psychic price to pay for lèse-majesté." — Roger Kaplan, The American Spectator, June 4, 2014

Did you know?
"Lèse-majesté" (or "lese majesty," as it is also styled in English publications) came into English by way of Middle French, from Latin "laesa majestas," which literally means "injured majesty." The English term can conceivably cover any offense against a sovereign power or its ruler, from treason to a simple breach of etiquette. "Lèse-majesté" has also acquired a more lighthearted or ironic meaning, that of an insult or impudence to a particularly pompous or self-important person or organization. As such, it may be applied to a relatively inoffensive act that has been exaggeratedly treated as if it were a great affront.

Categories: Fun Stuff

July 18, 1940: FDR nominated for unprecedented third term

This Day in History - Thu, 07/17/2014 - 11:00pm

On this day in 1940, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, who first took office in 1933 as America's 32nd president, is nominated for an unprecedented third term. Roosevelt, a Democrat, would eventually be elected to a record four terms in office, the only U.S. president to serve more than two terms.

Roosevelt was born January 30, 1882, in Hyde Park, New York, and went on to serve as a New York state senator from 1911 to 1913, assistant secretary of the Navy from 1913 to 1920 and governor of New York from 1929 to 1932. In 1932, he defeated incumbent Herbert Hoover to be elected president for the first time. During his first term, Roosevelt enacted his New Deal social programs, which were aimed at lifting America out of the Great Depression. In 1936, he won his second term in office by defeating Kansas governor Alf Landon in a landslide.

On July 18, 1940, Roosevelt was nominated for a third presidential term at the Democratic Party convention in Chicago. The president received some criticism for running again because there was an unwritten rule in American politics that no U.S. president should serve more than two terms. The custom dated back to the country's first president, George Washington, who in 1796 declined to run for a third term in office. Nevertheless, Roosevelt believed it was his duty to continue serving and lead his country through the mounting crisis in Europe, where Hitler's Nazi Germany was on the rise. The president went on to defeat Republican Wendell Wilkie in the general election, and his third term in office was dominated by America's involvement in World War II.

In 1944, with the war still in progress, Roosevelt defeated New York governor Thomas Dewey for a fourth term in office. However, the president was unable to complete the full term. On April 12, 1945, Roosevelt, who had suffered from various health problems for years, died at age 63 in Warm Springs, Georgia. He was succeeded by Vice President Harry S. Truman. On March 21, 1947, Congress passed the 22nd Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which stated that no person could be elected to the office of president more than twice. The amendment was ratified by the required number of states in 1951.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - July 17

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Thu, 07/17/2014 - 8:52pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

During a recent BrainBashers thinking contest, the total number of points scored by the first six players was 103 and every score was above zero.

The first player scored half the points of the second player, who in turn scored 6 points fewer than the third player.

The third player in turn scored two thirds the points of the fourth player.

The fifth player managed to score the same number of points as the difference between the first and fourth player's points.

Finally, the sixth player scored 14 fewer than the fifth player.

Can you determine how many points the sixth player managed to score?

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - July 17 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Thu, 07/17/2014 - 8:52pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - July 17

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Thu, 07/17/2014 - 8:52pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Sugar Rush
   You are a small orange creature with an appetite for sweets, cakes and ice cream.
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Dr. Thomas Fuller

Quotes of the Day - Thu, 07/17/2014 - 7:00pm
"Get the facts, or the facts will get you. And when you get them, get them right, or they will get you wrong."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Jay Leno

Quotes of the Day - Thu, 07/17/2014 - 7:00pm
"Give a man a fish and he will eat for a day. Teach a man to fish and he will eat for a lifetime. Teach a man to create an artificial shortage of fish and he will eat steak."
Categories: Fun Stuff