Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - December 9 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Tue, 12/09/2014 - 9:45pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - December 9

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Tue, 12/09/2014 - 9:45pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Square Man
   Very square platform game!
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

George Ade

Quotes of the Day - Tue, 12/09/2014 - 6:00pm
"'Whom are you?' he asked, for he had attended business college."
Categories: Fun Stuff

John Kenneth Galbraith

Quotes of the Day - Tue, 12/09/2014 - 6:00pm
"Politics is not the art of the possible. It consists in choosing between the disastrous and the unpalatable."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Katharine Hepburn

Quotes of the Day - Tue, 12/09/2014 - 6:00pm
"Acting is the most minor of gifts and not a very high-class way to earn a living. After all, Shirley Temple could do it at the age of four."
Categories: Fun Stuff

George Bernard Shaw

Quotes of the Day - Tue, 12/09/2014 - 6:00pm
"If all economists were laid end to end, they would not reach a conclusion."
Categories: Fun Stuff

mellifluous

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Tue, 12/09/2014 - 12:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for December 09, 2014 is:

mellifluous • \muh-LIFF-luh-wus\  • adjective
1 : having a smooth rich flow 2 : filled with something (such as honey) that sweetens

Examples:
The young diva has a powerful, mellifluous voice that makes her album a sweet aural confection.

"Corr recorded the album in Los Angeles with producer Mitchell Froom, and the style looks back to the mellifluous pop of the Carpenters, Dusty Springfield, and Burt Bacharach, music her parents played when she was a kid in the '70s." — Steve Klinge, Philadelphia Inquirer, March 14, 2014

Did you know?
In Latin, mel means "honey" and fluere means "to flow." Those two linguistic components flow smoothly together in mellifluus (from Late Latin) and mellyfluous (from Middle English), the ancestors of mellifluous. The adjective these days typically applies to sound, as it has for centuries. In 1671, for example, Milton wrote in Paradise Regained of the "Wisest of men; from whose mouth issu'd forth Mellifluous streams." But mellifluous can also be used of flavor, as when wine critic Eric Asimov used it to describe pinot grigio in the book Wine With Food: "Most pinot grigios give many people exactly what they want: a mellifluous, easy-to-pronounce wine that can be ordered without fear of embarrassment and that is at the least cold, refreshing, and for the most part cheap."

Categories: Fun Stuff

December 9, 1992: U.S Marines storm Mogadishu, Somalia

This Day in History - Mon, 12/08/2014 - 11:00pm

On this day in 1992, 1,800 United States Marines arrive in Mogadishu, Somalia, to spearhead a multinational force aimed at restoring order in the conflict-ridden country.

Following centuries of colonial rule by countries including Portugal, Britain and Italy, Mogadishu became the capital of an independent Somalia in 1960. Less than 10 years later, a military group led by Major General Muhammad Siad Barre seized power and declared Somalia a socialist state. A drought in the mid-1970s combined with an unsuccessful rebellion by ethnic Somalis in a neighboring province of Ethiopia to deprive many of food and shelter. By 1981, close to 2 million of the country's inhabitants were homeless.  Though a peace accord was signed with Ethiopia in 1988, fighting increased between rival clans within Somalia, and in January 1991 Barre was forced to flee the capital. Over the next 23 months, Somalia's civil war killed some 50,000 people; another 300,000 died of starvation as United Nations peacekeeping forces struggled in vain to restore order and provide relief amid the chaos of war.

In early December 1992, outgoing U.S. President George H.W. Bush sent the contingent of Marines to Mogadishu as part of a mission dubbed Operation Restore Hope. Backed by the U.S. troops, international aid workers were soon able to restore food distribution and other humanitarian aid operations. Sporadic violence continued, including the murder of 24 U.N. soldiers from Pakistan in 1993. As a result, the U.N. authorized the arrest of General Mohammed Farah Aidid, leader of one of the rebel clans. On October 3, 1993, during an attempt to make the arrest, rebels shot down two of the U.S. Army's Black Hawk helicopters and killed 18 American soldiers.

As horrified TV viewers watched images of the bloodshed—-including footage of Aidid's supporters dragging the body of one dead soldier through the streets of Mogadishu, cheering—-President Bill Clinton immediately gave the order for all American soldiers to withdraw from Somalia by March 31, 1994. Other Western nations followed suit. When the last U.N. peacekeepers left in 1995, ending a mission that had cost more than $2 billion, Mogadishu still lacked a functioning government. A ceasefire accord signed in Kenya in 2002 failed to put a stop to the violence, and though a new parliament was convened in 2004, rival factions in various regions of Somalia continue to struggle for control of the troubled nation.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - December 8

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Mon, 12/08/2014 - 9:31pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

Which is larger, the number of seconds in a day or the number hours in 10 years?

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - December 8 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Mon, 12/08/2014 - 9:31pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - December 8

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Mon, 12/08/2014 - 9:31pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Chamber Drop
   Drop the ball precisely on the target but watch out for fans!
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Evan Esar

Quotes of the Day - Mon, 12/08/2014 - 6:00pm
"America believes in education: the average professor earns more money in a year than a professional athlete earns in a whole week."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Joan Rivers

Quotes of the Day - Mon, 12/08/2014 - 6:00pm
"The first time I see a jogger smiling, I'll consider it."
Categories: Fun Stuff

H. L. Mencken

Quotes of the Day - Mon, 12/08/2014 - 6:00pm
"A cynic is a man who, when he smells flowers, looks around for a coffin."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Tommy Cooper

Quotes of the Day - Mon, 12/08/2014 - 6:00pm
"Last night I dreamed I ate a ten-pound marshmallow, and when I woke up the pillow was gone."
Categories: Fun Stuff

greenmail

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Mon, 12/08/2014 - 12:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for December 08, 2014 is:

greenmail • \GREEN-mail\  • noun
: the practice of buying enough of a company's stock to threaten a hostile takeover and reselling it to the company at a price above market value; also : the money paid for such stock

Examples:
In an astonishing act of greenmail, the investor bought up all available shares of the company and leveraged his sale back to the company at triple the purchase price.

"We arrived in the middle of great turmoil, with the era of greenmail and leveraged buyouts, when both managers and corporate raiders were abusing shareholders horribly." — Nell Minow, interview in USA TODAY, October 20, 2014

Did you know?
Greenmail is a recent English coinage, but its history spans a millennium. In the Anglo-Saxon historical records for 1086, we find an early use of a word that still survives in Scottish English as mail, meaning "payment" or "rent." The 16th century saw the appearance of the compound blackmail, which was originally a tribute that freebooting chiefs at the Scottish border exacted in exchange for immunity from pillage. In 1862, the U.S. government began printing paper money using green ink, and soon the word green came to suggest money. Finally, in the 1980s, greenmail was coined by combining green and blackmail to describe a particular type of financial piracy.

Categories: Fun Stuff

December 8, 1980: John Lennon shot

This Day in History - Sun, 12/07/2014 - 11:00pm

John Lennon, a former member of the Beatles, the rock group that transformed popular music in the 1960s, is shot and killed by an obsessed fan in New York City. The 40-year-old artist was entering his luxury Manhattan apartment building when Mark David Chapman shot him four times at close range with a .38-caliber revolver. Lennon, bleeding profusely, was rushed to the hospital but died en route. Chapman had received an autograph from Lennon earlier in the day and voluntarily remained at the scene of the shooting until he was arrested by police. For a week, hundreds of bereaved fans kept a vigil outside the Dakota--Lennon's apartment building--and demonstrations of mourning were held around the world.

John Lennon was one half of the singing-songwriting team that made the Beatles the most popular musical group of the 20th century. The other band leader was Paul McCartney, but the rest of the quartet--George Harrison and Ringo Starr--sometimes penned and sang their own songs as well. Hailing from Liverpool, England, and influenced by early American rock and roll, the Beatles took Britain by storm in 1963 with the single "Please Please Me." "Beatlemania" spread to the United States in 1964 with the release of "I Want to Hold Your Hand," followed by a sensational U.S. tour. With youth poised to break away from the culturally rigid landscape of the 1950s, the "Fab Four," with their exuberant music and good-natured rebellion, were the perfect catalyst for the shift.

The Beatles sold millions of records and starred in hit movies such as A Hard Day's Night (1964). Their live performances were near riots, with teenage girls screaming and fainting as their boyfriends nodded along to the catchy pop songs. In 1966, the Beatles gave up touring to concentrate on their innovative studio recordings, such as 1967's Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Heart's Club Band, a psychedelic concept album that is regarded as a masterpiece of popular music. The Beatles' music remained relevant to youth throughout the great cultural shifts of the 1960s, and critics of all ages acknowledged the songwriting genius of the Lennon-McCartney team.

Lennon was considered the intellectual Beatle and certainly was the most outspoken of the four. He caused a major controversy in 1966 when he declared that the Beatles were "more popular than Jesus," prompting mass burnings of Beatles' records in the American Bible Belt. He later became an anti-war activist and flirted with communism in the lyrics of solo hits like "Imagine," recorded after the Beatles disbanded in 1970. In 1975, Lennon dropped out of the music business to spend more time with his Japanese-born wife, Yoko Ono, and their son, Sean. In 1980, he made a comeback with Double-Fantasy, a critically acclaimed album that celebrated his love for Yoko and featured songs written by her.

On December 8, 1980, their peaceful domestic life on New York's Upper West Side was shattered by 25-year-old Mark David Chapman. Psychiatrists deemed Chapman a borderline psychotic. He was instructed to plead insanity, but instead he pleaded guilty to murder. He was sentenced to 20 years to life. In 2000, New York State prison officials denied Chapman a parole hearing, telling him that his "vicious and violent act was apparently fueled by your need to be acknowledged." He remains behind bars at Attica Prison in New York State.

John Lennon is memorialized in "Strawberry Fields," a section of Central Park across the street from the Dakota that Yoko Ono landscaped in honor of her husband.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - December 7

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sun, 12/07/2014 - 9:16pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

What well known saying is this:

lla ta devol evah ot reven naht tsol dna devol evah ot retteb si ti

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - December 7 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sun, 12/07/2014 - 9:16pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - December 7

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sun, 12/07/2014 - 9:16pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Jack Ice
   Blast the enemies with Jackice's ice gun, until they are totally frozen. Then use the frozen enemy as a giant snowball to crush others.
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff