Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - August 9 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sat, 08/09/2014 - 8:08pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - August 9

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sat, 08/09/2014 - 8:08pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Cut The Monster 2
   No one likes monsters! Here you have a chance to use your powerful lasers to cut them.
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Aaron McGruder

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 08/09/2014 - 7:00pm
"Late to bed and late to wake will keep you long on money and short on mistakes."
Categories: Fun Stuff

George Bernard Shaw

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 08/09/2014 - 7:00pm
"People are always blaming their circumstances for what they are. I don't believe in circumstances. The people who get on in this world are the people who get up and look for the circumstances they want, and, if they can't find them, make them."
Categories: Fun Stuff

J. W. Eagan

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 08/09/2014 - 7:00pm
"Never judge a book by its movie."
Categories: Fun Stuff

John Russell

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 08/09/2014 - 7:00pm
"Sanity calms, but madness is more interesting."
Categories: Fun Stuff

apophasis

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Sat, 08/09/2014 - 1:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for August 09, 2014 is:

apophasis • \uh-PAH-fuh-sis\  • noun
: the raising of an issue by claiming not to mention it

Examples:
"I won't bring up that little incident that happened the last time you tried to cook a meal," said Laura, in a blatant display of apophasis.

"The hope is that if people recognize when rhetoric is being used to deceive, they will learn to use more persuasive language themselves. For example, salespeople tell us 'you don't need to decide now.' This is apophasis, whereby the negative words do not stick in our minds and appear to reject a point while actually emphasizing it." — Nicholas Cole, Alternatives Journal, 2014

Did you know?
Apophasis is a sly debater's trick, a way of sneaking an issue into the discussion while maintaining plausible deniability. It should come as no surprise, then, that the roots of "apophasis" lie in the concept of denial—the word was adopted into English from Late Latin, where it means "repudiation," and derives from the Greek "apophanai," meaning "to deny." ("Apophanai," in turn, comes from "apo-," meaning "away from" or "off," and "phanai," meaning "to say.") This particular rhetorical stunt is also known by the labels "preterition" and "paraleipsis" (which is a Greek word for "omission"), but those words are rarer than "apophasis." Incidentally, don’t confuse "apophasis" with "apophysis"; the latter is a scientific word for an expanded or projecting part of an organism.

Categories: Fun Stuff

August 9, 1974: Unusual succession makes Ford president

This Day in History - Fri, 08/08/2014 - 11:00pm

In accordance with his statement of resignation the previous evening, Richard M. Nixon officially ends his term as the 37th president of the United States at noon. Before departing with his family in a helicopter from the White House lawn, he smiled farewell and enigmatically raised his arms in a victory or peace salute. The helicopter door was then closed, and the Nixon family began their journey home to San Clemente, California. Richard Nixon was the first U.S. president to resign from office.

Minutes later, Vice President Gerald R. Ford was sworn in as the 38th president of the United States in the East Room of the White House. After taking the oath of office, President Ford spoke to the nation in a television address, declaring, "My fellow Americans, our long national nightmare is over."

Ford, the first president who came to the office through appointment rather than election, had replaced Spiro Agnew as vice president only eight months before. In a political scandal independent of the Nixon administration's wrongdoings in the Watergate affair, Agnew had been forced to resign in disgrace after he was charged with income tax evasion and political corruption. In September 1974, Ford pardoned Nixon for any crimes he may have committed while in office, explaining that he wanted to end the national divisions created by the Watergate scandal.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - August 8

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Fri, 08/08/2014 - 7:54pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

At the bread factory, 2 bread-men can bake 6 rolls in 3 hours.

By this same reasoning, how many bread-men will it take to bake 22 rolls in 5 hours?

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - August 8 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Fri, 08/08/2014 - 7:54pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - August 8

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Fri, 08/08/2014 - 7:54pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Massive Tank Attack
   You are in a tank and you need to destroy the other tanks.
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Oscar Wilde

Quotes of the Day - Fri, 08/08/2014 - 7:00pm
"One should absorb the colour of life, but one should never remember its details. Details are always vulgar."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Clive James

Quotes of the Day - Fri, 08/08/2014 - 7:00pm
"Everyone has a right to a university degree in America, even if it's in Hamburger Technology."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Wendell Johnson

Quotes of the Day - Fri, 08/08/2014 - 7:00pm
"Always and never are two words you should always remember never to use."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Franklin P. Jones

Quotes of the Day - Fri, 08/08/2014 - 7:00pm
"The trouble with being punctual is that nobody's there to appreciate it."
Categories: Fun Stuff

foolscap

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Fri, 08/08/2014 - 1:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for August 08, 2014 is:

foolscap • \FOOLZ-kap\  • noun
1 : a cap or hood usually with bells worn by jesters 2 : a conical cap for slow or lazy students 3 : a size of paper formerly standard in Great Britain; broadly : a piece of writing paper

Examples:
The exhibit includes a number of early legal documents written on foolscap with quill and ink.

"In 1894, Lincoln's personal secretary, John Nicolay, published what he called 'the autograph manuscript' of the Gettysburg Address. The first page was written in pen on lined stationery marked 'Executive Mansion'; the second is in pencil on bluish foolscap." — Allen G. Breed, Watertown Daily Times (New York), November 24, 2013

Did you know?
These days, we are most likely to encounter "foolscap" as a reference to a sheet of paper or, more specifically, to a sheet of paper that is similar in size to a sheet of legal paper. In the mid-1600s, when the use of "foolscap" was first attested to in English, we would have encountered it as a reference to an actual fool's cap—the cap, often with bells on, worn as part of a jester's motley. How did we get from this colorful cap to a sheet of paper? The connection is attributable to the former use of a watermark depicting a fool's cap that was used on long sheets of writing or printing paper. There are various explanations for the introduction of this watermark—including the claim that a 1648 British parliamentary group substituted it for the royal arms during exceptionally turbulent times—but such explanations remain unsupported by historical facts.

Categories: Fun Stuff

August 8, 1974: Nixon resigns

This Day in History - Thu, 08/07/2014 - 11:00pm

In an evening televised address, President Richard M. Nixon announces his intention to become the first president in American history to resign. With impeachment proceedings underway against him for his involvement in the Watergate affair, Nixon was finally bowing to pressure from the public and Congress to leave the White House. "By taking this action," he said in a solemn address from the Oval Office, "I hope that I will have hastened the start of the process of healing which is so desperately needed in America."

Just before noon the next day, Nixon officially ended his term as the 37th president of the United States. Before departing with his family in a helicopter from the White House lawn, he smiled farewell and enigmatically raised his arms in a victory or peace salute. The helicopter door was then closed, and the Nixon family began their journey home to San Clemente, California. Minutes later, Vice President Gerald R. Ford was sworn in as the 38th president of the United States in the East Room of the White House. After taking the oath of office, President Ford spoke to the nation in a television address, declaring, "My fellow Americans, our long national nightmare is over." He later pardoned Nixon for any crimes he may have committed while in office, explaining that he wanted to end the national divisions created by the Watergate scandal.

On June 17, 1972, five men, including a salaried security coordinator for President Nixon's reelection committee, were arrested for breaking into and illegally wiretapping the Democratic National Committee headquarters in the Washington, D.C., Watergate complex. Soon after, two other former White House aides were implicated in the break-in, but the Nixon administration denied any involvement. Later that year, reporters Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward of The Washington Post discovered a higher-echelon conspiracy surrounding the incident, and a political scandal of unprecedented magnitude erupted.

In May 1973, the Senate Select Committee on Presidential Campaign Activities, headed by Senator Sam Ervin of North Carolina, began televised proceedings on the rapidly escalating Watergate affair. One week later, Harvard law professor Archibald Cox was sworn in as special Watergate prosecutor. During the Senate hearings, former White House legal counsel John Dean testified that the Watergate break-in had been approved by former Attorney General John Mitchell with the knowledge of White House advisers John Ehrlichman and H.R. Haldeman, and that President Nixon had been aware of the cover-up. Meanwhile, Watergate prosecutor Cox and his staff began to uncover widespread evidence of political espionage by the Nixon reelection committee, illegal wiretapping of thousands of citizens by the administration, and contributions to the Republican Party in return for political favors.

In July, the existence of what were to be called the Watergate tapes--official recordings of White House conversations between Nixon and his staff--was revealed during the Senate hearings. Cox subpoenaed these tapes, and after three months of delay President Nixon agreed to send summaries of the recordings. Cox rejected the summaries, and Nixon fired him. His successor as special prosecutor, Leon Jaworski, leveled indictments against several high-ranking administration officials, including Mitchell and Dean, who were duly convicted.

Public confidence in the president rapidly waned, and by the end of July 1974 the House Judiciary Committee had adopted three articles of impeachment against President Nixon: obstruction of justice, abuse of presidential powers, and hindrance of the impeachment process. On July 30, under coercion from the Supreme Court, Nixon finally released the Watergate tapes. On August 5, transcripts of the recordings were released, including a segment in which the president was heard instructing Haldeman to order the FBI to halt the Watergate investigation. Three days later, Nixon announced his resignation.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - August 7

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Thu, 08/07/2014 - 7:40pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

Can you find three consecutive even numbers that total 85,008 when multiplied together?

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - August 7 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Thu, 08/07/2014 - 7:40pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - August 7

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Thu, 08/07/2014 - 7:40pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Elite Base Jump
   Stretch your reflexes to the limit and be the first to reach the ground safely to win the competition.
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff