Fun Stuff

Daily Game - July 18

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Fri, 07/18/2014 - 9:06pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Ping
   A curious game played vertically and horizontally at the same time.
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

John Green

Quotes of the Day - Fri, 07/18/2014 - 7:00pm
"The United States Congress, like a lot of rich people, lives in two houses."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Robertson Davies

Quotes of the Day - Fri, 07/18/2014 - 7:00pm
"To be a book-collector is to combine the worst characteristics of a dope fiend with those of a miser."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Albert Einstein

Quotes of the Day - Fri, 07/18/2014 - 7:00pm
"Yes, we have to divide up our time like that, between our politics and our equations. But to me our equations are far more important, for politics are only a matter of present concern. A mathematical equation stands forever."
Categories: Fun Stuff

William Blake

Quotes of the Day - Fri, 07/18/2014 - 7:00pm
"It is easier to forgive an enemy than to forgive a friend."
Categories: Fun Stuff

lèse-majesté

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Fri, 07/18/2014 - 1:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for July 18, 2014 is:

lèse-majesté • \layz-MAJ-uh-stee\  • noun
1 : an offense violating the dignity of sovereign 2 : a detraction from or affront to dignity or importance

Examples:
"That kind of suppression actually harkens back … to the 1976 coup, when the penalty for lèse majesté was increased to a maximum of 15 years in prison per count.…" —David Streckfuss, Vice News, June 3, 2014

"You can look it up, but every man who beat Roger Federer this year lost his next match. Maybe there is a psychic price to pay for lèse-majesté." — Roger Kaplan, The American Spectator, June 4, 2014

Did you know?
"Lèse-majesté" (or "lese majesty," as it is also styled in English publications) came into English by way of Middle French, from Latin "laesa majestas," which literally means "injured majesty." The English term can conceivably cover any offense against a sovereign power or its ruler, from treason to a simple breach of etiquette. "Lèse-majesté" has also acquired a more lighthearted or ironic meaning, that of an insult or impudence to a particularly pompous or self-important person or organization. As such, it may be applied to a relatively inoffensive act that has been exaggeratedly treated as if it were a great affront.

Categories: Fun Stuff

July 18, 1940: FDR nominated for unprecedented third term

This Day in History - Thu, 07/17/2014 - 11:00pm

On this day in 1940, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, who first took office in 1933 as America's 32nd president, is nominated for an unprecedented third term. Roosevelt, a Democrat, would eventually be elected to a record four terms in office, the only U.S. president to serve more than two terms.

Roosevelt was born January 30, 1882, in Hyde Park, New York, and went on to serve as a New York state senator from 1911 to 1913, assistant secretary of the Navy from 1913 to 1920 and governor of New York from 1929 to 1932. In 1932, he defeated incumbent Herbert Hoover to be elected president for the first time. During his first term, Roosevelt enacted his New Deal social programs, which were aimed at lifting America out of the Great Depression. In 1936, he won his second term in office by defeating Kansas governor Alf Landon in a landslide.

On July 18, 1940, Roosevelt was nominated for a third presidential term at the Democratic Party convention in Chicago. The president received some criticism for running again because there was an unwritten rule in American politics that no U.S. president should serve more than two terms. The custom dated back to the country's first president, George Washington, who in 1796 declined to run for a third term in office. Nevertheless, Roosevelt believed it was his duty to continue serving and lead his country through the mounting crisis in Europe, where Hitler's Nazi Germany was on the rise. The president went on to defeat Republican Wendell Wilkie in the general election, and his third term in office was dominated by America's involvement in World War II.

In 1944, with the war still in progress, Roosevelt defeated New York governor Thomas Dewey for a fourth term in office. However, the president was unable to complete the full term. On April 12, 1945, Roosevelt, who had suffered from various health problems for years, died at age 63 in Warm Springs, Georgia. He was succeeded by Vice President Harry S. Truman. On March 21, 1947, Congress passed the 22nd Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which stated that no person could be elected to the office of president more than twice. The amendment was ratified by the required number of states in 1951.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - July 17

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Thu, 07/17/2014 - 8:52pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

During a recent BrainBashers thinking contest, the total number of points scored by the first six players was 103 and every score was above zero.

The first player scored half the points of the second player, who in turn scored 6 points fewer than the third player.

The third player in turn scored two thirds the points of the fourth player.

The fifth player managed to score the same number of points as the difference between the first and fourth player's points.

Finally, the sixth player scored 14 fewer than the fifth player.

Can you determine how many points the sixth player managed to score?

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - July 17 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Thu, 07/17/2014 - 8:52pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - July 17

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Thu, 07/17/2014 - 8:52pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Sugar Rush
   You are a small orange creature with an appetite for sweets, cakes and ice cream.
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Dr. Thomas Fuller

Quotes of the Day - Thu, 07/17/2014 - 7:00pm
"Get the facts, or the facts will get you. And when you get them, get them right, or they will get you wrong."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Jay Leno

Quotes of the Day - Thu, 07/17/2014 - 7:00pm
"Give a man a fish and he will eat for a day. Teach a man to fish and he will eat for a lifetime. Teach a man to create an artificial shortage of fish and he will eat steak."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Edward Teller

Quotes of the Day - Thu, 07/17/2014 - 7:00pm
"Two paradoxes are better than one; they may even suggest a solution."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Joey Bishop

Quotes of the Day - Thu, 07/17/2014 - 7:00pm
"Today you can go to a gas station and find the cash register open and the toilets locked. They must think toilet paper is worth more than money."
Categories: Fun Stuff

walleyed

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Thu, 07/17/2014 - 1:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for July 17, 2014 is:

walleyed • \WAWL-EYED\  • adjective
1 : having walleyes or affected with walleye 2 : marked by a wild irrational staring of the eyes

Examples:
After getting beaned by the pitcher, the walleyed batter was immediately checked by the paramedics for signs of a concussion.

"And then after that, there's a picture with 10-year-old me holding a dog toy, staring at the viewer, sort of walleyed.…" — Allie Brosh, NPR (Fresh Air) interview, November 12, 2013

Did you know?
The noun "walleye" has several meanings. It can refer to an eye with a whitish or bluish-white iris or to one with an opaque white cornea. It can also refer to a condition in which the eye turns outward away from the nose. The extended second sense of the adjective "walleyed" came from the appearance of eyes affected with the condition of walleye. You might guess that "walleyed" has an etymological connection with "wall," but that's not the case. Rather, it is derived from "wawil-eghed," a Middle English translation of the Old Norse word "vagl-eygr," from "vagl" ("beam") and "eygr" ("eyed").

Categories: Fun Stuff

July 17, 1955: Disneyland opens

This Day in History - Wed, 07/16/2014 - 11:00pm

Disneyland, Walt Disney's metropolis of nostalgia, fantasy, and futurism, opens on July 17, 1955. The $17 million theme park was built on 160 acres of former orange groves in Anaheim, California, and soon brought in staggering profits. Today, Disneyland hosts more than 14 million visitors a year, who spend close to $3 billion.

Walt Disney, born in Chicago in 1901, worked as a commercial artist before setting up a small studio in Los Angeles to produce animated cartoons. In 1928, his short film Steamboat Willy, starring the character "Mickey Mouse," was a national sensation. It was the first animated film to use sound, and Disney provided the voice for Mickey. From there on, Disney cartoons were in heavy demand, but the company struggled financially because of Disney's insistence on ever-improving artistic and technical quality. His first feature-length cartoon, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1938), took three years to complete and was a great commercial success.

Snow White was followed by other feature-length classics for children, such as Pinocchio (1940), Dumbo (1941), and Bambi (1942). Fantasia (1940), which coordinated animated segments with famous classical music pieces, was an artistic and technical achievement. In Song of the South (1946), Disney combined live actors with animated figures, and beginning with Treasure Island in 1950 the company added live-action movies to its repertoire. Disney was also one of the first movie studios to produce film directly for television, and its Zorro and Davy Crockett series were very popular with children.

In the early 1950s, Walt Disney began designing a huge amusement park to be built near Los Angeles. He intended Disneyland to have educational as well as amusement value and to entertain adults and their children. Land was bought in the farming community of Anaheim, about 25 miles southeast of Los Angeles, and construction began in 1954. In the summer of 1955, special invitations were sent out for the opening of Disneyland on July 17. Unfortunately, the pass was counterfeited and thousands of uninvited people were admitted into Disneyland on opening day. The park was not ready for the public: food and drink ran out, a women's high-heel shoe got stuck in the wet asphalt of Main Street USA, and the Mark Twain Steamboat nearly capsized from too many passengers.

Disneyland soon recovered, however, and attractions such as the Castle, Mr. Toad's Wild Ride, Snow White's Adventures, Space Station X-1, Jungle Cruise, and Stage Coach drew countless children and their parents. Special events and the continual building of new state-of-the-art attractions encouraged them to visit again. In 1965, work began on an even bigger Disney theme park and resort near Orlando, Florida. Walt Disney died in 1966, and Walt Disney World was opened in his honor on October 1, 1971. Epcot Center, Disney-MGM Studios, and Animal Kingdom were later added to Walt Disney World, and it remains Florida's premier tourist attraction. In 1983, Disneyland Tokyo opened in Japan, and in 1992 Disneyland Paris--or "EuroDisney"--opened to a mixed reaction in Marne-la-Vallee. The newest Disneyland, in Hong Kong, opened its doors in September 2005.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - July 16

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Wed, 07/16/2014 - 8:38pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

Standing on a one way street, were two highway patrol officers, specifically looking for drivers who were in violation of local traffic laws.

A taxi driver was going the wrong way down the street, however, the officers did nothing. What explanation can you offer?

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - July 16 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Wed, 07/16/2014 - 8:38pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - July 16

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Wed, 07/16/2014 - 8:38pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Mouse In Danger
   A mouse memory game where you have to guide the cursor through a hidden maze.
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Logan Pearsall Smith

Quotes of the Day - Wed, 07/16/2014 - 7:00pm
"What music is more enchanting than the voices of young people, when you can't hear what they say?"
Categories: Fun Stuff