Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - November 18

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Tue, 11/18/2014 - 6:23pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

Find two words, which are anagrams of each other, which complete this sentence:

Due to a recent outbreak of a ==?== infection in the zebra house, the local zoo had to ==?== their electron microscope correctly, to ensure rapid detection.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - November 18 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Tue, 11/18/2014 - 6:23pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - November 18

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Tue, 11/18/2014 - 6:23pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Ice Rush
   Extreme Arctic racing game.
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Randy K. Milholland

Quotes of the Day - Tue, 11/18/2014 - 6:00pm
"Nothing like a lot of exercise to make you realize you'd rather be lazy and dead sooner."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Fyodor Dostoevsky

Quotes of the Day - Tue, 11/18/2014 - 6:00pm
"Man is tormented by no greater anxiety than to find someone quickly to whom he can hand over that great gift of freedom with which the ill-fated creature is born."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Margot Asquith

Quotes of the Day - Tue, 11/18/2014 - 6:00pm
"What a pity, when Christopher Colombus discovered America, that he ever mentioned it."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Oscar Wilde

Quotes of the Day - Tue, 11/18/2014 - 6:00pm
"I suppose that I shall have to die beyond my means."
Categories: Fun Stuff

leitmotif

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Tue, 11/18/2014 - 12:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for November 18, 2014 is:

leitmotif • \LYTE-moh-teef\  • noun
1 : a melodic phrase or figure that accompanies the reappearance of an idea, person, or situation in a music drama 2 : a dominant recurring theme

Examples:
The overcoming of obstacles and a love of theater are the two leitmotifs of her autobiography.

"'Collaboration' is the author's supporting theme, and he weaves it in throughout his anecdotes and character studies. Approached lazily, this kind of leitmotif would be more irritating than illuminating, but Isaacson fully commits." — James Norton, The Christian Science Monitor, October 13, 2014

Did you know?
The English word leitmotif (or leitmotiv, as it is also spelled) comes from the German Leitmotiv, meaning "leading motive" and formed from leiten ("to lead") and Motiv ("motive"). In its original sense, the word applies to opera music and was first used by writers interpreting the works of composer Richard Wagner, who was famous for associating a melody with a character or important dramatic element. Leitmotif is still commonly used with reference to music and musical drama but is now also used more broadly to refer to any recurring theme in the arts or in everyday life.

Categories: Fun Stuff

November 18, 1991: Terry Waite released

This Day in History - Mon, 11/17/2014 - 11:00pm

Shiite Muslim kidnappers in Lebanon free Anglican Church envoy Terry Waite after more than four years of captivity. Waite, looking thinner and his hair grayer, was freed along with American educator Thomas M. Sutherland after intense negotiations by the United Nations.

Waite, special envoy of the archbishop of Canterbury, had secured the release of missionaries detained in Iran after the Islamic revolution. He also extracted British hostages from Libya and even succeeded in releasing American hostages from Lebanon in 1986.

A total of 10 captives were released through Waite's efforts before Shiite Muslims seized him during a return mission to Beirut on January 20, 1987. He was held captive for more than four years before he was finally released.

During captivity, Waite said he was frequently blindfolded, beaten and subjected to mock executions. He spent much of the time chained to a radiator, suffered from asthma and was transported in a giant refrigerator as his captors moved him about.

Waite, 52, made an impromptu, chaotic appearance before reporters in Damascus after his release to Syrian officials. He said one of his captors expressed regret as he informed Waite he was about to be released.

"He also said to me: 'We apologize for having captured you. We recognize that now this was a wrong thing to do, that holding hostages achieves no useful, constructive purpose,'" Waite said.

The release of Waite and Sutherland left five Western hostages left in Beirut—three Americans, including Terry Anderson, and two Germans. The Americans would be released by December 1991, the Germans in June 1992.

Some 96 foreign hostages were taken and held during the Lebanon hostage crisis between 1982 and 1992. The victims were mostly from Western countries, and mostly journalists, diplomats or teachers. Twenty-five of them were Americans. At least 10 hostages died in captivity. Some were murdered and others died from lack of adequate medical attention to illnesses.

The hostages were originally taken to serve as insurance against retaliation against Hezbollah, which was thought to be responsible for the killing of over 300 Americans in the Marine barracks and embassy bombings in Beirut. It was widely believed that Iran and Syria also played a role in the kidnappings.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - November 17

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Mon, 11/17/2014 - 6:09pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

A prisoner is enclosed in a room.

This room has no doors, no windows and no other hole large enough for the prisoner to escape via. He has no tools, he has no assistance. He does have a table and a chair in the centre of the room. The room is quite large, walls are two foot thick.

How can the prisoner escape?

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - November 17 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Mon, 11/17/2014 - 6:09pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - November 17

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Mon, 11/17/2014 - 6:09pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Virus
   A classic arcade shooter, fight the 3 types of virus before they start to spread. Use bombs to destroy the genes before they take hold.
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Bertrand Russell

Quotes of the Day - Mon, 11/17/2014 - 6:00pm
"A sense of duty is useful in work, but offensive in personal relations. People wish to be liked, not be endured with patient resignation."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Samuel Goldwyn

Quotes of the Day - Mon, 11/17/2014 - 6:00pm
"Television has raised writing to a new low."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Dale Carnegie

Quotes of the Day - Mon, 11/17/2014 - 6:00pm
"Any fool can criticize, condemn, and complain - and most fools do."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Jewish Proverb

Quotes of the Day - Mon, 11/17/2014 - 6:00pm
"If God lived on earth, people would break his windows."
Categories: Fun Stuff

rife

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Mon, 11/17/2014 - 12:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for November 17, 2014 is:

rife • \RYFE\  • adjective
1 : prevalent especially to an increasing degree 2 : abundant, common 3 : copiously supplied : abounding

Examples:
After the newspaper's managing editor was fired, speculation was rife about who would replace him.

"In the battle over Amendment 2, Drug Free Florida has decried the medical marijuana ballot initiative as being rife with loopholes." — Dan Sweeney, The Sun-Sentinel (South Florida), October 15, 2014

Did you know?
English is rife with words that have Germanic connections, many of which have been handed down to us from Old English. Rife is one of those words. Not a whole lot has changed with rife in its 900-year history. We continue to use the word, as we have since the 12th century, for negative things, especially those that are widespread or prevalent. Typical examples are "shoplifting was rife" or "the city was rife with greed and corruption." Rumors and speculation are also frequently described as "rife," as well. But rife can also be appropriately used, as it has been for hundreds of years, for good or neutral things. For example, you might speak of "the summer garden, rife with scents."

Categories: Fun Stuff

November 17, 1558: Elizabethan Age begins

This Day in History - Sun, 11/16/2014 - 11:00pm

Queen Mary I, the monarch of England and Ireland since 1553, dies and is succeeded by her 25-year-old half-sister, Elizabeth.

The two half-sisters, both daughters of King Henry VIII, had a stormy relationship during Mary's five-year reign. Mary, who was brought up as a Catholic, enacted pro-Catholic legislation and made efforts to restore the pope to supremacy in England. A Protestant rebellion ensued, and Queen Mary imprisoned Elizabeth, a Protestant, in the Tower of London on suspicion of complicity. After Mary's death, Elizabeth survived several Catholic plots against her; though her ascension was greeted with approval by most of England's lords, who were largely Protestant and hoped for greater religious tolerance under a Protestant queen. Under the early guidance of Secretary of State Sir William Cecil, Elizabeth repealed Mary's pro-Catholic legislation, established a permanent Protestant Church of England, and encouraged the Calvinist reformers in Scotland.

In foreign affairs, Elizabeth practiced a policy of strengthening England's Protestant allies and dividing her foes. Elizabeth was opposed by the pope, who refused to recognize her legitimacy, and by Spain, a Catholic nation that was at the height of its power. In 1588, English-Spanish rivalry led to an abortive Spanish invasion of England in which the Spanish Armada, the greatest naval force in the world at the time, was destroyed by storms and a determined English navy.

With increasing English domination at sea, Elizabeth encouraged voyages of discovery, such as Sir Francis Drake's circumnavigation of the world and Sir Walter Raleigh's expeditions to the North American coast.

The long reign of Elizabeth, who became known as the "Virgin Queen" for her reluctance to endanger her authority through marriage, coincided with the flowering of the English Renaissance, associated with such renowned authors as William Shakespeare. By her death in 1603, England had become a major world power in every respect, and Queen Elizabeth I passed into history as one of England's greatest monarchs.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Fran Lebowitz

Quotes of the Day - Sun, 11/16/2014 - 6:00pm
"If you are a dog and your owner suggests that you wear a sweater, suggest that he wear a tail."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Bill Watterson

Quotes of the Day - Sun, 11/16/2014 - 6:00pm
"Leave it to a girl to take the fun out of sex discrimination."
Categories: Fun Stuff