Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - April 12

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sat, 04/12/2014 - 7:55pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

Five girls took part in a race.

Alison finished before Bunty but behind Clare. Debby finished before Emma but behind Bunty.

What was the finishing order?

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - April 12 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sat, 04/12/2014 - 7:55pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - April 12

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sat, 04/12/2014 - 7:55pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Bounce
   Can you capture 75% of the playing area?
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Seth MacFarlane

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 04/12/2014 - 7:00pm
"The two symbols of the Republican Party: an elephant, and a big fat white guy who is threatened by change."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Indira Gandhi

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 04/12/2014 - 7:00pm
"You cannot shake hands with a clenched fist."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Laurence J. Peter

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 04/12/2014 - 7:00pm
"Competence, like truth, beauty and contact lenses, is in the eye of the beholder."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Jerome K. Jerome

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 04/12/2014 - 7:00pm
"It is always the best policy to speak the truth--unless, of course, you are an exceptionally good liar."
Categories: Fun Stuff

recondite

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Sat, 04/12/2014 - 1:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for April 12, 2014 is:

recondite • \REK-un-dyte\  • adjective
1 : hidden from sight : concealed 2 : difficult or impossible for one of ordinary understanding or knowledge to comprehend : deep 3 : of, relating to, or dealing with something little known or obscure

Examples:
"We hear from mathematicians that bees have practically solved a recondite problem, and have made their cells of the proper shape to hold the greatest possible amount of honey, with the least possible consumption of precious wax in their construction." — From Charles Darwin's 1859 book On the Origin of Species

"The week after Michelle Obama went on Jimmy Fallon's 'Late Night' show to present the recondite art of Mom Dancing, her segment doomed Jay Leno in Fallon's favor." — From an article by Jeff Simon in The Buffalo News (New York), December 29, 2013

Did you know?
While "recondite" may be used to describe something difficult to understand, there is nothing recondite about the word's history. It dates to the early 1600s, when it was coined from the synonymous Latin word "reconditus." "Recondite" is one of those underused but useful words that's always a boon to one's vocabulary, but take off the "re-" and you get something very obscure: "condite" is an obsolete verb meaning both "to pickle or preserve" and "to embalm." If we add the prefix "in-" to "condite" we get "incondite," which means "badly put together," as in "incondite prose." All three words have Latin "condere" at their root; that verb is translated variously as "to put or bring together," "to put up, store," and "to conceal."

Categories: Fun Stuff

April 12, 1861: The Civil War begins

This Day in History - Fri, 04/11/2014 - 11:00pm

The bloodiest four years in American history begin when Confederate shore batteries under General P.G.T. Beauregard open fire on Union-held Fort Sumter in South Carolina's Charleston Bay. During the next 34 hours, 50 Confederate guns and mortars launched more than 4,000 rounds at the poorly supplied fort. On April 13, U.S. Major Robert Anderson surrendered the fort. Two days later, U.S. President Abraham Lincoln issued a proclamation calling for 75,000 volunteer soldiers to quell the Southern "insurrection."

As early as 1858, the ongoing conflict between North and South over the issue of slavery had led Southern leadership to discuss a unified separation from the United States. By 1860, the majority of the slave states were publicly threatening secession if the Republicans, the anti-slavery party, won the presidency. Following Republican Abraham Lincoln's victory over the divided Democratic Party in November 1860, South Carolina immediately initiated secession proceedings. On December 20, the South Carolina legislature passed the "Ordinance of Secession," which declared that "the Union now subsisting between South Carolina and other states, under the name of the United States of America, is hereby dissolved." After the declaration, South Carolina set about seizing forts, arsenals, and other strategic locations within the state. Within six weeks, five more Southern states--Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, and Louisiana--had followed South Carolina's lead.

In February 1861, delegates from those states convened to establish a unified government. Jefferson Davis of Mississippi was subsequently elected the first president of the Confederate States of America. When Abraham Lincoln was inaugurated on March 4, 1861, a total of seven states (Texas had joined the pack) had seceded from the Union, and federal troops held only Fort Sumter in South Carolina, Fort Pickens off the Florida coast, and a handful of minor outposts in the South. Four years after the Confederate attack on Fort Sumter, the Confederacy was defeated at the total cost of 620,000 Union and Confederate soldiers dead.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - April 11

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Fri, 04/11/2014 - 7:41pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

Fred can eat 27 chocolates in a hour, Alice can eat 2 chocolates in 10 minutes, and Kelly can eat 7 chocolates in 20 minutes.

How long will it take them to share and eat a large box of 120 chocolates whilst watching a movie?

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - April 11 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Fri, 04/11/2014 - 7:41pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - April 11

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Fri, 04/11/2014 - 7:41pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Magic Vines
   Can you clear the tiles by matching 3 in a row?
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Jules Renard

Quotes of the Day - Fri, 04/11/2014 - 7:00pm
"Look for the ridiculous in everything and you will find it."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Howard Dietz

Quotes of the Day - Fri, 04/11/2014 - 7:00pm
"I don't like composers who think. It gets in the way of their plagiarism."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Rita Mae Brown

Quotes of the Day - Fri, 04/11/2014 - 7:00pm
"I finally figured out the only reason to be alive is to enjoy it."
Categories: Fun Stuff

John Cage

Quotes of the Day - Fri, 04/11/2014 - 7:00pm
"I can't understand why people are frightened of new ideas. I'm frightened of the old ones."
Categories: Fun Stuff

collimate

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Fri, 04/11/2014 - 1:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for April 11, 2014 is:

collimate • \KAH-luh-mayt\  • verb
: to make (something, such as light rays) parallel

Examples:
"Amazingly, some astrophysical jets—streams of charged particles collimated and accelerated over astronomical distances—also exhibit a helical structure." — From an article by Mario Livio on The Huffington Post, November 20, 2013

"The higher cost and fixed eyepieces of the … binoculars are distinct disadvantages, but setup time is reduced—there's no need to collimate optics or align tube assemblies." — From a product review by Phil Harrington in Astronomy, February 2004

Did you know?
One might expect a science-y word like "collimate" to have a straightforward etymology, but that's not the case. "Collimate" comes from Latin "collimare," a misreading of the Latin word "collineare," meaning "to direct in a straight line." The erroneous "collimare" appeared in some editions of the works of ancient Roman statesman Cicero and scholar Aulus Gellius. The error was propagated by later writers—most notably by astronomers, such as Johannes Kepler, who wrote in Latin. And so it was the spelling "collimate," rather than "collineate," that passed into English in the 19th century.

Categories: Fun Stuff

April 11, 1814: Napoleon exiled to Elba

This Day in History - Thu, 04/10/2014 - 11:00pm

On this day in 1814, Napoleon Bonaparte, emperor of France and one of the greatest military leaders in history, abdicates the throne, and, in the Treaty of Fontainebleau, is banished to the Mediterranean island of Elba.

The future emperor was born in Ajaccio, Corsica, on August 15, 1769. After attending military school, he fought during the French Revolution of 1789 and rapidly rose through the military ranks, leading French troops in a number of successful campaigns throughout Europe in the late 1700s. By 1799, he had established himself at the top of a military dictatorship. In 1804, he became emperor of France and continued to consolidate power through his military campaigns, so that by 1810 much of Europe came under his rule. Although Napoleon developed a reputation for being power-hungry and insecure, he is also credited with enacting a series of important political and social reforms that had a lasting impact on European society, including judiciary systems, constitutions, voting rights for all men and the end of feudalism. Additionally, he supported education, science and literature. His Code Napoleon, which codified key freedoms gained during the French Revolution, such as religious tolerance, remains the foundation of French civil law.

In 1812, thinking that Russia was plotting an alliance with England, Napoleon launched an invasion against the Russians that eventually ended with his troops retreating from Moscow and much of Europe uniting against him. In 1814, Napoleon's broken forces gave up and Napoleon offered to step down in favor of his son. When this offer was rejected, he abdicated and was sent to Elba. In March 1815, he escaped his island exile and returned to Paris, where he regained supporters and reclaimed his emperor title, Napoleon I, in a period known as the Hundred Days. However, in June 1815, he was defeated at the bloody Battle of Waterloo. Napoleon's defeat ultimately signaled the end of France's domination of Europe. He abdicated for a second time and was exiled to the remote island of Saint Helena, in the southern Atlantic Ocean, where he lived out the rest of his days. He died at age 52 on May 5, 1821, possibly from stomach cancer, although some theories contend he was poisoned.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - April 10

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Thu, 04/10/2014 - 7:27pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

Can you find the hidden country in the following sentence:

All of our newspaper undermanagers require a ten percent pay increase before they will consider working again.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - April 10 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Thu, 04/10/2014 - 7:27pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff