Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - March 22

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sun, 03/22/2015 - 9:56pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

After a local bungled heist, five suspects were being interviewed by the police.

Eventually the police managed to get a confession.

Below is a summary of their statements and it turns out that exactly 5 of these statements were true.

Would you make a good detective, try and work out who committed the crime?

Adrian said:
It wasn't Barry
It was Cedric

Barry said:
It wasn't Adrian
It was Derek

Cedric said:
It wasn't Derek
It wasn't Barry

Derek said:
It wasn't Eric
It was Adrian

Eric said:
It wasn't Cedric
It was Derek

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - March 22 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sun, 03/22/2015 - 9:56pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - March 22

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sun, 03/22/2015 - 9:56pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Bike Finish Line
   Find all of the hidden numbers through each of the illustrated levels.
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Margaret Halsey

Quotes of the Day - Sun, 03/22/2015 - 7:00pm
"Whenever I dwell for any length of time on my own shortcomings, they gradually begin to seem mild, harmless, rather engaging little things, not at all like the staring defects in other people's characters."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Ring Lardner

Quotes of the Day - Sun, 03/22/2015 - 7:00pm
"A good many young writers make the mistake of enclosing a stamped, self-addressed envelope, big enough for the manuscript to come back in. This is too much of a temptation to the editor."
Categories: Fun Stuff

James M. Barrie

Quotes of the Day - Sun, 03/22/2015 - 7:00pm
"Nothing is really work unless you would rather be doing something else."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Joey Adams

Quotes of the Day - Sun, 03/22/2015 - 7:00pm
"A psychiatrist is a fellow who asks you a lot of expensive questions your wife asks for nothing."
Categories: Fun Stuff

firebrand

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Sun, 03/22/2015 - 1:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for March 22, 2015 is:

firebrand • \FYRE-brand\  • noun
1 : a piece of burning wood 2 : one that creates unrest or strife (as in aggressively promoting a cause) : agitator

Examples:
She's an activist who views herself as a relentless firebrand willing to stand up for her beliefs even when they are not popular.

"Collins said Americans shouldn't just think of Malcolm X as a firebrand but should be inspired by him to understand and be vigilant about liberties for all." — Susanne Cervenka, USA Today, February 17, 2015

Did you know?
The original firebrands were incendiary indeed: they were pieces of wood set burning at the fire, perhaps for use as a light or a weapon. English speakers started brandishing those literal firebrands as long ago as the 13th century. (Robinson Crusoe held one high as he rushed into a cave on his deserted island and saw "by the light of the firebrand . . . lying on the ground a monstrous, frightful old he-goat.") But the burning embers of the wooden firebrand quickly sparked figurative uses for the term, too. By the early 14th century, firebrand was also being used for one doomed to burn in hell, and by 1382, English writers were using it for anyone who kindled mischief or inflamed passions.

Categories: Fun Stuff

March 22, 1765: Stamp Act imposed on American colonies

This Day in History - Sat, 03/21/2015 - 11:00pm

In an effort to raise funds to pay off debts and defend the vast new American territories won from the French in the Seven Years’ War (1756-1763), the British government passes the Stamp Act on this day in 1765. The legislation levied a direct tax on all materials printed for commercial and legal use in the colonies, from newspapers and pamphlets to playing cards and dice.

Though the Stamp Act employed a strategy that was a common fundraising vehicle in England, it stirred a storm of protest in the colonies. The colonists had recently been hit with three major taxes: the Sugar Act (1764), which levied new duties on imports of textiles, wines, coffee and sugar; the Currency Act (1764), which caused a major decline in the value of the paper money used by colonists; and the Quartering Act (1765), which required colonists to provide food and lodging to British troops.

With the passing of the Stamp Act, the colonists’ grumbling finally became an articulated response to what they saw as the mother country’s attempt to undermine their economic strength and independence. They raised the issue of taxation without representation, and formed societies throughout the colonies to rally against the British government and nobles who sought to exploit the colonies as a source of revenue and raw materials. By October of that year, nine of the 13 colonies sent representatives to the Stamp Act Congress, at which the colonists drafted the “Declaration of Rights and Grievances,” a document that railed against the autocratic policies of the mercantilist British empire.

Realizing that it actually cost more to enforce the Stamp Act in the protesting colonies than it did to abolish it, the British government repealed the tax the following year. The fracas over the Stamp Act, though, helped plant seeds for a far larger movement against the British government and the eventual battle for independence. Most important of these was the formation of the Sons of Liberty–a group of tradesmen who led anti-British protests in Boston and other seaboard cities–and other groups of wealthy landowners who came together from the across the colonies. Well after the Stamp Act was repealed, these societies continued to meet in opposition to what they saw as the abusive policies of the British empire. Out of their meetings, a growing nationalism emerged that would culminate in the fighting of the American Revolution only a decade later.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - March 21

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sat, 03/21/2015 - 9:42pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

Pear is to apple what potato is to:

banana, radish, strawberry, peach, lettuce

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - March 21 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sat, 03/21/2015 - 9:42pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - March 21

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sat, 03/21/2015 - 9:42pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Count 10
   Click 1-10 in sequence. Simple?
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Robert Half

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 03/21/2015 - 7:00pm
"What happens when the future has come and gone?"
Categories: Fun Stuff

Aldous Huxley

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 03/21/2015 - 7:00pm
"Most human beings have an almost infinite capacity for taking things for granted."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Japanese Proverb

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 03/21/2015 - 7:00pm
"If you believe everything you read, better not read."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Ronald Reagan

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 03/21/2015 - 7:00pm
"I have left orders to be awakened at any time in case of national emergency, even if I'm in a cabinet meeting."
Categories: Fun Stuff

expiate

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Sat, 03/21/2015 - 1:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for March 21, 2015 is:

expiate • \EK-spee-ayt\  • verb
1 : to extinguish the guilt incurred by 2 : to make amends for

Examples:
Though the editorial characterizes the mayor's failure to disclose the details of the meeting as a lapse that cannot be expiated, most citizens seem ready to forgive all.

"The ethical ambiguity of Szuml's role as Sonderkommando—a 'gray zone,' as Primo Levi described it, victim verging on perpetrator—is expiated to a degree by an act of self-sacrifice." — Tova Reich, Washington Post, September 25, 2014

Did you know?
"Disaster shall fall upon you, which you will not be able to expiate." That ominous biblical prophecy (Isaiah 47:11, RSV) shows that expiate was once involved in confronting the forces of evil as well as in assuaging guilt. The word derives from expiare, Latin for "to atone for," a root that in turn traces to the Latin term for "pious." Expiate originally referred to warding off evil by using sacred rites or to using sacred rites to cleanse or purify something. By the 17th century, Shakespeare (and others) were using it to mean "to put an end to": "But when in thee time's furrows I behold, / Then look I death my days should expiate" (Sonnet 22). Those senses have since become obsolete, and now only the "extinguish the guilt" and "make amends" senses remain in use.

Categories: Fun Stuff

March 21, 1871: Stanley begins search for Livingstone

This Day in History - Fri, 03/20/2015 - 11:00pm

On this day in 1871, journalist Henry Morton Stanley begins his famous search through Africa for the missing British explorer Dr. David Livingstone.

In the late 19th century, Europeans and Americans were deeply fascinated by the “Dark Continent” of Africa and its many mysteries. Few did more to increase Africa’s fame than Livingstone, one of England’s most intrepid explorers. In August 1865, he set out on a planned two-year expedition to find the source of the Nile River. Livingstone also wanted to help bring about the abolition of the slave trade, which was devastating Africa’s population.

Almost six years after his expedition began, little had been heard from Livingstone. James Gordon Bennett, Jr., editor of the New York Herald, decided to capitalize on the public’s craze for news of their hero. He sent Stanley to lead an expedition into the African wilderness to find Livingstone or bring back proof of his death. At age 28, Stanley had his own fascinating past. As a young orphan in Wales, he crossed the Atlantic on the crew of a merchant ship. He jumped ship in New Orleans and later served in the Civil War as both a Confederate and a Union soldier before beginning a career in journalism.

After setting out from Zanzibar in March 1871, Stanley led his caravan of nearly 2,000 men into the interior of Africa. Nearly eight months passed–during which Stanley contracted dysentery, cerebral malaria and smallpox–before the expedition approached the village of Ujiji, on the shore of Lake Tanganyika. Sick and poverty-stricken, Livingstone had come to Ujiji that July after living for some time at the mercy of Arab slave traders. When Stanley’s caravan entered the village on October 27, flying the American flag, villagers crowded toward the new arrivals. Spotting a white man with a gray beard in the crowd, Stanley stepped toward him and stretched out his hand: “Dr. Livingstone, I presume?”

These words–and Livingstone’s grateful response–soon became famous across Europe and the United States. Though Stanley urged Livingstone to return with him to London, the explorer vowed to continue his original mission. Livingstone died 18 months later in today’s Zambia; his body was embalmed and returned to Britain, where he was buried in Westminster Abbey. As for Stanley, he returned to Africa to fulfill a promise he had made to Livingstone to find the source of the Nile. He later damaged his reputation by accepting money from King Leopold II of Belgium to help create the Belgian-ruled Congo Free State and promote the slave trade. When he left Africa, Stanley resumed his British citizenship and even served in Parliament, but when he died he was refused burial in Westminster Abbey because of his actions in the Congo Free State.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - March 20

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Fri, 03/20/2015 - 9:28pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

The spy was captured easily, and his message proved to be so simple that the lieutenant saw its importance immediately. What does it say?

Alice: Tom told Ann Carter Killy and Ted, David Atwood was not moving out now. David awaiting you.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - March 20 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Fri, 03/20/2015 - 9:28pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff