Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - July 16

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Wed, 07/16/2014 - 8:38pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

Standing on a one way street, were two highway patrol officers, specifically looking for drivers who were in violation of local traffic laws.

A taxi driver was going the wrong way down the street, however, the officers did nothing. What explanation can you offer?

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - July 16 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Wed, 07/16/2014 - 8:38pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - July 16

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Wed, 07/16/2014 - 8:38pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Mouse In Danger
   A mouse memory game where you have to guide the cursor through a hidden maze.
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Logan Pearsall Smith

Quotes of the Day - Wed, 07/16/2014 - 7:00pm
"What music is more enchanting than the voices of young people, when you can't hear what they say?"
Categories: Fun Stuff

Alan Perlis

Quotes of the Day - Wed, 07/16/2014 - 7:00pm
"The computing field is always in need of new cliches."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Janet Long

Quotes of the Day - Wed, 07/16/2014 - 7:00pm
"Part of being sane, is being a little bit crazy."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Saki

Quotes of the Day - Wed, 07/16/2014 - 7:00pm
"Addresses are given to us to conceal our whereabouts."
Categories: Fun Stuff

steampunk

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Wed, 07/16/2014 - 1:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for July 16, 2014 is:

steampunk • \STEEM-punk\  • noun
: science fiction dealing with 19th-century societies dominated by historical or imagined steam-powered technology

Examples:
"The multiroom bar and restaurant is now decked out with steampunk-ish exposed ducts, geometric light fixtures, and rustic barn doors." — Anna Roth, SF Weekly, June 18, 2014

"It is also the vision of steampunk, a subculture that is the aesthetic expression of a time-traveling fantasy world, one that embraces music, film, design and now fashion, all inspired by the extravagantly inventive age of dirigibles and steam locomotives, brass diving bells and jar-shaped protosubmarines." — Ruth La Ferla, New York Times, May 8, 2008

Did you know?
"I think Victorian fantasies are going to be the next big thing, as long as we can come up with a fitting collective term for [Tim] Powers, [James] Blaylock and myself." So wrote the science-fiction author K. W. Jeter, credited with coining the term "steampunk" in 1987 to describe a wave of fantasy novels set in Victorian times and celebrating the technology of the era, much of which was powered by steam. In both name and subject, "steampunk" is an antithesis to "cyberpunk," a genre often noted for featuring computerized, futuristic, or unearthly settings. The popularity of steampunk has since carried over to motion pictures, fashion, and even things like restaurant décor.

Categories: Fun Stuff

July 16, 1945: Atom bomb successfully tested

This Day in History - Tue, 07/15/2014 - 11:00pm

On this day in 1945, at 5:29:45 a.m., the Manhattan Project comes to an explosive end as the first atom bomb is successfully tested in Alamogordo, New Mexico.

Plans for the creation of a uranium bomb by the Allies were established as early as 1939, when Italian emigre physicist Enrico Fermi met with U.S. Navy department officials at Columbia University to discuss the use of fissionable materials for military purposes. That same year, Albert Einstein wrote to President Franklin Roosevelt supporting the theory that an uncontrolled nuclear chain reaction had great potential as a basis for a weapon of mass destruction. In February 1940, the federal government granted a total of $6,000 for research. But in early 1942, with the United States now at war with the Axis powers, and fear mounting that Germany was working on its own uranium bomb, the War Department took a more active interest, and limits on resources for the project were removed.

Brigadier-General Leslie R. Groves, himself an engineer, was now in complete charge of a project to assemble the greatest minds in science and discover how to harness the power of the atom as a means of bringing the war to a decisive end. The Manhattan Project (so-called because of where the research began) would wind its way through many locations during the early period of theoretical exploration, most importantly, the University of Chicago, where Enrico Fermi successfully set off the first fission chain reaction. But the Project took final form in the desert of New Mexico, where, in 1943, Robert J. Oppenheimer began directing Project Y at a laboratory at Los Alamos, along with such minds as Hans Bethe, Edward Teller, and Fermi. Here theory and practice came together, as the problems of achieving critical mass-a nuclear explosion-and the construction of a deliverable bomb were worked out.

Finally, on the morning of July 16, in the New Mexico desert 120 miles south of Santa Fe, the first atomic bomb was detonated. The scientists and a few dignitaries had removed themselves 10,000 yards away to observe as the first mushroom cloud of searing light stretched 40,000 feet into the air and generated the destructive power of 15,000 to 20,000 tons of TNT. The tower on which the bomb sat when detonated was vaporized.

The question now became-on whom was the bomb to be dropped? Germany was the original target, but the Germans had already surrendered. The only belligerent remaining was Japan.

A footnote: The original $6,000 budget for the Manhattan Project finally ballooned to a total cost of $2 billion.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - July 15

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Tue, 07/15/2014 - 8:24pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

There are a few ways of making twenty-four using just three identical digits, 8 + 8 + 8 is one way, can you find any of the others?

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - July 15 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Tue, 07/15/2014 - 8:24pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - July 15

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Tue, 07/15/2014 - 8:24pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Premiere League Foosball
   Play Foosball with your favourite UK football team.
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Oscar Wilde

Quotes of the Day - Tue, 07/15/2014 - 7:00pm
"A man can be happy with any woman as long as he does not love her."
Categories: Fun Stuff

George Bernard Shaw

Quotes of the Day - Tue, 07/15/2014 - 7:00pm
"We don't bother much about dress and manners in England, because as a nation we don't dress well and we've no manners."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Garry Shandling

Quotes of the Day - Tue, 07/15/2014 - 7:00pm
"I'm too shy to express my sexual needs except over the phone to people I don't know."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Irv Kupcinet

Quotes of the Day - Tue, 07/15/2014 - 7:00pm
"What can you say about a society that says that God is dead and Elvis is alive?"
Categories: Fun Stuff

instigate

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Tue, 07/15/2014 - 1:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for July 15, 2014 is:

instigate • \IN-stuh-gayt\  • verb
: to cause to happen or begin : to goad or urge forward : provoke

Examples:
"The catcher instigated the collision by blocking home plate without the ball." — Ryne Sandberg, quoted in The Philadelphia Inquirer, June 8, 2014

"U.S. and European Union officials accuse Russian President Vladimir Putin of instigating the insurgency against Kiev…."— Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times, June 3, 2014

Did you know?
"Instigate" is often used as a synonym of "incite" (as in "hoodlums instigating violence"), but the two words differ slightly in their overall usage. "Incite" usually stresses an act of stirring something up that one did not necessarily initiate ("the court's decision incited riots"). "Instigate" implies responsibility for initiating or encouraging someone else's action and usually suggests dubious or underhanded intent ("he was charged with instigating a conspiracy"). Another similar word, "foment," implies causing something by means of persistent goading ("the leader's speeches fomented a rebellion"). Deriving from the past participle of the Latin verb "instigare," "instigate" first appeared in English in the mid-16th century, approximately 60 years after "incite" and about 70 years before "foment."

Categories: Fun Stuff

July 15, 1971: Nixon announces visit to communist China

This Day in History - Mon, 07/14/2014 - 11:00pm

During a live television and radio broadcast, President Richard Nixon stuns the nation by announcing that he will visit communist China the following year. The statement marked a dramatic turning point in U.S.-China relations, as well as a major shift in American foreign policy.

Nixon was not always so eager to reach out to China. Since the Communists came to power in China in 1949, Nixon had been one of the most vociferous critics of American efforts to establish diplomatic relations with the Chinese. His political reputation was built on being strongly anti-communist, and he was a major figure in the post-World War II Red Scare, during which the U.S. government launched massive investigations into possible communist subversion in America.

By 1971, a number of factors pushed Nixon to reverse his stance on China. First and foremost was the Vietnam War. Two years after promising the American people "peace with honor," Nixon was as entrenched in Vietnam as ever. His national security advisor, Henry Kissinger, saw a way out: Since China's break with the Soviet Union in the mid-1960s, the Chinese were desperate for new allies and trade partners. Kissinger aimed to use the promise of closer relations and increased trade possibilities with China as a way to put increased pressure on North Vietnam--a Chinese ally--to reach an acceptable peace settlement. Also, more importantly in the long run, Kissinger thought the Chinese might become a powerful ally against the Soviet Union, America’s Cold War enemy. Kissinger called such foreign policy 'realpolitik,' or politics that favored dealing with other powerful nations in a practical manner rather than on the basis of political doctrine or ethics.

Nixon undertook his historic "journey for peace" in 1972, beginning a long and gradual process of normalizing relations between the People's Republic of China and the United States. Though this move helped revive Nixon’s sagging popularity, and contributed to his win in the 1972 election, it did not produce the short-term results for which Kissinger had hoped. The Chinese seemed to have little influence on North Vietnam's negotiating stance, and the Vietnam War continued to drag on until U.S. withdrawal in 1973. Further, the budding U.S.-China alliance had no measurable impact on U.S.-Soviet relations. But, Nixon's visit did prove to be a watershed moment in American foreign policy--it paved the way for future U.S. presidents to apply the principle of realpolitik to their own international dealings.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - July 14

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Mon, 07/14/2014 - 8:10pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

Place the words below into pairs.

You will then have 5 lots of eight letters, each of which is an anagram of an animal.

What are the original 5 animals?

PINK
TENT
MOST
MUCH
THEN
LEAP
SOOT
AREA
TIRE
MARE

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - July 14 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Mon, 07/14/2014 - 8:10pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff