Fun Stuff

Daily Game - September 26

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Fri, 09/26/2014 - 7:09pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Lucky Balls
   Circular version of the game where you clear the screen of bubbles by forming groups of 3 of the same colour.
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Marie Curie

Quotes of the Day - Fri, 09/26/2014 - 7:00pm
"There are sadistic scientists who hurry to hunt down errors instead of establishing the truth."
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Saki

Quotes of the Day - Fri, 09/26/2014 - 7:00pm
"He is one of those people who would be enormously improved by death."
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Groucho Marx

Quotes of the Day - Fri, 09/26/2014 - 7:00pm
"I find television very educating. Every time somebody turns on the set, I go into the other room and read a book."
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Muhammad Ali

Quotes of the Day - Fri, 09/26/2014 - 7:00pm
"My toughest fight was with my first wife."
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Götterdämmerung

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Fri, 09/26/2014 - 1:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for September 26, 2014 is:

Götterdämmerung • \gher-ter-DEM-uh-roong\  •
: a collapse (as of a society or regime) marked by catastrophic violence and disorder; broadly : downfall

Examples:
There were those who worried that the latest civil war and attempted regime change would end in Götterdämmerung for the small country.

"One wishes, of course, for some sort of Götterdämmerung … in which the former victims rise up to give the monsters a taste of their terrible medicine. That's what the movies are for." — James Taub, Stars and Stripes, August 23, 2014

Did you know?
Norse mythology specified that the destruction of the world would be preceded by a cataclysmic final battle between the good and evil gods, resulting in the heroic deaths of all the "good guys." The German word for this earth-shattering last battle was Götterdämmerung. Literally, Götterdämmerung means "twilight of the gods." (Götter is the plural of Gott, meaning "god," and Dämmerung means "twilight.") Figuratively, the term is extended to situations of world-altering destruction marked by extreme chaos and violence. In the 19th century, the German composer Richard Wagner brought attention to the word Götterdämmerung when he chose it as the title of the last opera of his cycle Der Ring des Nibelungen, and by the early 20th century, the word had entered English.

Categories: Fun Stuff

September 26, 1960: First Kennedy-Nixon debate

This Day in History - Thu, 09/25/2014 - 11:00pm

For the first time in U.S. history, a debate between major party presidential candidates is shown on television. The presidential hopefuls, John F. Kennedy, a Democratic senator of Massachusetts, and Richard M. Nixon, the vice president of the United States, met in a Chicago studio to discuss U.S. domestic matters.

Kennedy emerged the apparent winner from this first of four televised debates, partly owing to his greater ease before the camera than Nixon, who, unlike Kennedy, seemed nervous and declined to wear makeup. Nixon fared better in the second and third debates, and on October 21 the candidates met to discuss foreign affairs in their fourth and final debate. Less than three weeks later, on November 8, Kennedy won 49.7 percent of the popular vote in one of the closest presidential elections in U.S. history, surpassing by a fraction the 49.6 percent received by his Republican opponent.

One year after leaving the vice presidency, Nixon returned to politics, winning the Republican nomination for governor of California. Although he lost the election, Nixon returned to the national stage in 1968 in a successful bid for the presidency. Like Lyndon Johnson in 1964, Nixon declined to debate his opponent in the 1968 presidential campaign. Televised presidential debates returned in 1976, and have been held in every presidential campaign since.

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Franz Kafka

Quotes of the Day - Thu, 09/25/2014 - 7:00pm
"There art two cardinal sins from which all others spring: Impatience and Laziness."
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Kin Hubbard

Quotes of the Day - Thu, 09/25/2014 - 7:00pm
"There's no secret about success. Did you ever know a successful man who didn't tell you about it?"
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E. M. Forster

Quotes of the Day - Thu, 09/25/2014 - 7:00pm
"Works of art, in my opinion, are the only objects in the material universe to possess internal order, and that is why, though I don't believe that only art matters, I do believe in Art for Art's sake."
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H. L. Mencken

Quotes of the Day - Thu, 09/25/2014 - 7:00pm
"I never lecture, not because I am shy or a bad speaker, but simply because I detest the sort of people who go to lectures and don't want to meet them."
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Daily Puzzle - September 25

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Thu, 09/25/2014 - 6:56pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

What proverb is hidden below?

Laughing out openly kills bees. Even foxy orangutans relish eating yellowy orange umbrellas. Leopards eat angry people.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - September 25 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Thu, 09/25/2014 - 6:56pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - September 25

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Thu, 09/25/2014 - 6:56pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Egg Catcher
   Catch all of the eggs as they fall from the chickens.
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

palaver

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Thu, 09/25/2014 - 1:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for September 25, 2014 is:

palaver • \puh-LAV-er\  • noun
1 : a long discussion or meeting usually between persons of different cultures or levels of sophistication 2 a : idle talk b : misleading or beguiling speech

Examples:
"I don't know how you can stand to listen to that palaver," said Rachel, as she switched off the talk show her brother had been listening to on the radio.

"The violinist Geoff Nuttall now directs the series, with a more contemporary sensibility in both programming and in the often corny introductory palaver carried over from the Wadsworth era." — James R. Oestreich, The New York Times, June 4, 2014

Did you know?
During the 18th century, Portuguese and English sailors often met during trading trips along the West African coast. This contact prompted the English to borrow the Portuguese palavra, which usually means "speech" or "word" but was used by Portuguese traders with the specific meaning "discussions with natives." The Portuguese word traces back to the Late Latin parabola, a noun meaning "speech" or "parable," which in turn comes from the Greek parabolē, meaning "juxtaposition" or "comparison."

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September 25, 1957: Central High School integrated

This Day in History - Wed, 09/24/2014 - 11:00pm

Under escort from the U.S. Army's 101st Airborne Division, nine black students enter all-white Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas. Three weeks earlier, Arkansas Governor Orval Faubus had surrounded the school with National Guard troops to prevent its federal court-ordered racial integration. After a tense standoff, President Dwight D. Eisenhower federalized the Arkansas National Guard and sent 1,000 army paratroopers to Little Rock to enforce the court order.

On May 17, 1954, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled unanimously in Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka that racial segregation in educational facilities was unconstitutional. Five days later, the Little Rock School Board issued a statement saying it would comply with the decision when the Supreme Court outlined the method and time frame in which desegregation should be implemented.

Arkansas was at the time among the more progressive Southern states in regard to racial issues. The University of Arkansas School of Law was integrated in 1949, and the Little Rock Public Library in 1951. Even before the Supreme Court ordered integration to proceed "with all deliberate speed," the Little Rock School Board in 1955 unanimously adopted a plan of integration to begin in 1957 at the high school level. The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) filed suit, arguing the plan was too gradual, but a federal judge dismissed the suit, saying that the school board was acting in "utmost good faith." Meanwhile, Little Rock's public buses were desegregated. By 1957, seven out of Arkansas' eight state universities were integrated.

In the spring of 1957, there were 517 black students who lived in the Central High School district. Eighty expressed an interest in attending Central in the fall, and they were interviewed by the Little Rock School Board, which narrowed down the number of candidates to 17. Eight of those students later decided to remain at all-black Horace Mann High School, leaving the "Little Rock Nine" to forge their way into Little Rock's premier high school.

In August 1957, the newly formed Mother's League of Central High School won a temporary injunction from the county chancellor to block integration of the school, charging that it "could lead to violence." Federal District Judge Ronald Davies nullified the injunction on August 30. On September 2, Governor Orval Faubus—a staunch segregationist—called out the Arkansas National Guard to surround Central High School and prevent integration, ostensibly to prevent the bloodshed he claimed desegregation would cause. The next day, Judge Davies ordered integrated classes to begin on September 4.

That morning, 100 armed National Guard troops encircled Central High School. A mob of 400 white civilians gathered and turned ugly when the black students began to arrive, shouting racial epithets and threatening the teenagers with violence. The National Guard troops refused to let the black students pass and used their clubs to control the crowd. One of the nine, 15-year-old Elizabeth Eckford, was surrounded by the mob, which threatened to lynch her. She was finally led to safety by a sympathetic white woman.

Little Rock Mayor Woodrow Mann condemned Faubus' decision to call out the National Guard, but the governor defended his action, reiterating that he did so to prevent violence. The governor also stated that integration would occur in Little Rock when and if a majority of people chose to support it. Faubus' defiance of Judge Davies' court order was the first major test of Brown v. Board of Education and the biggest challenge of the federal government's authority over the states since the Reconstruction Era.

The standoff continued, and on September 20 Judge Davies ruled that Faubus had used the troops to prevent integration, not to preserve law and order as he claimed. Faubus had no choice but to withdraw the National Guard troops. Authority over the explosive situation was put in the hands of the Little Rock Police Department.

On September 23, as a mob of 1,000 whites milled around outside Central High School, the nine black students managed to gain access to a side door. However, the mob became unruly when it learned the black students were inside, and the police evacuated them out of fear for their safety. That evening, President Eisenhower issued a special proclamation calling for opponents of the federal court order to "cease and desist." On September 24, Little Rock's mayor sent a telegram to the president asking him to send troops to maintain order and complete the integration process. Eisenhower immediately federalized the Arkansas National Guard and approved the deployment of U.S. troops to Little Rock. That evening, from the White House, the president delivered a nationally televised address in which he explained that he had taken the action to defend the rule of law and prevent "mob rule" and "anarchy." On September 25, the Little Rock Nine entered the school under heavily armed guard.

Troops remained at Central High School throughout the school year, but still the black students were subjected to verbal and physical assaults from a faction of white students. Melba Patillo, one of the nine, had acid thrown in her eyes, and Elizabeth Eckford was pushed down a flight of stairs. The three male students in the group were subjected to more conventional beatings. Minnijean Brown was suspended after dumping a bowl of chili over the head of a taunting white student. She was later suspended for the rest of the year after continuing to fight back. The other eight students consistently turned the other cheek. On May 27, 1958, Ernest Green, the only senior in the group, became the first black to graduate from Central High School.

Governor Faubus continued to fight the school board's integration plan, and in September 1958 he ordered Little Rock's three high schools closed rather than permit integration. Many Little Rock students lost a year of education as the legal fight over desegregation continued. In 1959, a federal court struck down Faubus' school-closing law, and in August 1959 Little Rock's white high schools opened a month early with black students in attendance. All grades in Little Rock public schools were finally integrated in 1972.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Lewis Carroll

Quotes of the Day - Wed, 09/24/2014 - 7:00pm
"If you don't know where you are going, any road will take you there."
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John Wilmot

Quotes of the Day - Wed, 09/24/2014 - 7:00pm
"Before I got married I had six theories about bringing up children; now I have six children and no theories."
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Dorothy L. Sayers

Quotes of the Day - Wed, 09/24/2014 - 7:00pm
"A facility for quotation covers the absence of original thought."
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Ernest Hemingway

Quotes of the Day - Wed, 09/24/2014 - 7:00pm
"Never confuse movement with action."
Categories: Fun Stuff