Fun Stuff

Woody Allen

Quotes of the Day - Tue, 01/17/2017 - 6:00pm
"What if everything is an illusion and nothing exists? In that case, I definitely overpaid for my carpet."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Elbert Hubbard

Quotes of the Day - Tue, 01/17/2017 - 6:00pm
"Genius may have its limitations, but stupidity is not thus handicapped."
Categories: Fun Stuff

abstemious

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Mon, 01/16/2017 - 11:00pm

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for January 17, 2017 is:

abstemious • \ab-STEE-mee-us\  • adjective

: marked by restraint especially in the consumption of food or alcohol; also : reflecting such restraint

Examples:

Allie's midlife heart attack opened her eyes to the importance of taking care of her body and turned her to a more abstemious and healthful lifestyle.

"He is so abstemious that he once declared that to avoid temptation, he would never appear anywhere alcohol was served unless his wife was with him." — Michael Barbaro and Monica Davey, The New York Times, 16 July 2016

Did you know?

Abstemious and abstain look alike, and both have meanings involving self-restraint or self-denial. So they must both come from the same root, right? Yes and no. Both get their start from the Latin prefix abs-, meaning "from" or "away." But abstain traces to the Latin abstinēre, a combination of abs- and the Latin verb tenēre ("to hold"), while abstemious comes from the Latin abstēmius, which combines abs- with tēm- (a stem found in the Latin tēmētum, "intoxicating beverage," and tēmulentus, "drunken") and the adjectival suffix -ius ("full of, abounding in, having, possessing the qualities of").



Categories: Fun Stuff

January 17, 1950: Boston thieves pull off historic robbery

This Day in History - Mon, 01/16/2017 - 11:00pm

On this day in 1950, 11 men steal more than $2 million from the Brinks Armored Car depot in Boston, Massachusetts. It was the perfect crime–almost–as the culprits weren’t caught until January 1956, just days before the statute of limitations for the theft expired.

The robbery’s mastermind was Anthony “Fats” Pino, a career criminal who recruited a group of 10 other men to stake out the depot for 18 months to figure out when it held the most money. Pino’s men then managed to steal plans for the depot’s alarm system, returning them before anyone noticed they were gone.

Wearing navy blue coats and chauffeur’s caps–similar to the Brinks employee uniforms–with rubber Halloween masks, the thieves entered the depot with copied keys, surprising and tying up several employees inside the company’s counting room. Filling 14 canvas bags with cash, coins, checks and money orders–for a total weight of more than half a ton–the men were out and in their getaway car in about 30 minutes. Their haul? More than $2.7 million–the largest robbery in U.S. history up until that time.

No one was hurt in the robbery, and the thieves left virtually no clues, aside from the rope used to tie the employees and one of the chauffeur’s caps. The gang promised to stay out of trouble and not touch the money for six years in order for the statute of limitations to run out. They might have made it, but for the fact that one man, Joseph “Specs” O’Keefe, left his share with another member in order to serve a prison sentence for another burglary. While in jail, O’Keefe wrote bitterly to his cohorts demanding money and hinting he might talk. The group sent a hit man to kill O’Keefe, but he was caught before completing his task. The wounded O’Keefe made a deal with the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) to testify against his fellow robbers.

Eight of the Brinks robbers were caught, convicted and given life sentences. Two more died before they could go to trial. Only a small part of the money was ever recovered; the rest is fabled to be hidden in the hills north of Grand Rapids, Minnesota. In 1978, the famous robbery was immortalized on film in The Brinks Job, starring Peter Falk.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Ronald Reagan

Quotes of the Day - Mon, 01/16/2017 - 6:00pm
"The nine most terrifying words in the English language are, 'I'm from the government and I'm here to help.'"
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Robert Frost

Quotes of the Day - Mon, 01/16/2017 - 6:00pm
"Two roads diverged in a wood, and I--/ I took the one less traveled by, / And that has made all the difference."
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Thomas A. Edison

Quotes of the Day - Mon, 01/16/2017 - 6:00pm
"There is no expedient to which a man will not go to avoid the labor of thinking."
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Stephen Leacock

Quotes of the Day - Mon, 01/16/2017 - 6:00pm
"Advertising may be described as the science of arresting the human intelligence long enough to get money from it."
Categories: Fun Stuff

paladin

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Sun, 01/15/2017 - 11:00pm

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for January 16, 2017 is:

paladin • \PAL-uh-din\  • noun

1 : a trusted military leader (as for a medieval prince)

2 : a leading champion of a cause

Examples:

The prince summoned the paladin to commend him for his actions in battle.

"This collection of stories by one of England's best novelists is both playful and serious in the manner of Laurence Sterne, the 18th-century author of 'Tristram Shandy'…. Sterne was the master of the marginal, the random, the inconsequential. In our own day, David Foster Wallace, Geoff Dyer and Ali Smith have become the paladins of this goofy manner." — Edmund White, The New York Times, 2 Dec. 2016

Did you know?

In ancient Rome, the emperor's palace was located on the Palatine Hill, known as Palatium in Latin. Since the site was the seat of imperial power, the word palatium came to mean "imperial" and later "imperial official." Different forms of the word passed through Latin, Italian, and French, picking up various meanings along the way, and eventually some of those forms made their way into English. Paladin is one of the etymological heirs of palatium; another descendant is the word palace.



Categories: Fun Stuff

January 16, 1919: Prohibition takes effect

This Day in History - Sun, 01/15/2017 - 11:00pm

The 18th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, prohibiting the “manufacture, sale, or transportation of intoxicating liquors for beverage purposes,” is ratified on this day in 1919 and becomes the law of the land.

The movement for the prohibition of alcohol began in the early 19th century, when Americans concerned about the adverse effects of drinking began forming temperance societies. By the late 19th century, these groups had become a powerful political force, campaigning on the state level and calling for total national abstinence. In December 1917, the 18th Amendment, also known as the Prohibition Amendment, was passed by Congress and sent to the states for ratification.

Prohibition took effect in January 1919. Nine months later, Congress passed the Volstead Act, or National Prohibition Act, over President Woodrow Wilson’s veto. The Volstead Act provided for the enforcement of prohibition, including the creation of a special unit of the Treasury Department. Despite a vigorous effort by law-enforcement agencies, the Volstead Act failed to prevent the large-scale distribution of alcoholic beverages, and organized crime flourished in America. In 1933, the 21st Amendment to the Constitution was passed and ratified, repealing prohibition.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Jackie Mason

Quotes of the Day - Sun, 01/15/2017 - 6:00pm
"Eighty percent of married men cheat in America. The rest cheat in Europe."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Arnold Lobel

Quotes of the Day - Sun, 01/15/2017 - 6:00pm
"Books to the ceiling,/ Books to the sky,/ My pile of books is a mile high./ How I love them! How I need them!/ I'll have a long beard by the time I read them."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Samuel Butler

Quotes of the Day - Sun, 01/15/2017 - 6:00pm
"Genius might be described as a supreme capacity for getting its possessors into trouble of all kinds."
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Judith Martin

Quotes of the Day - Sun, 01/15/2017 - 6:00pm
"There are three social classes in America: upper middle class, middle class, and lower middle class."
Categories: Fun Stuff

cantankerous

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Sat, 01/14/2017 - 11:00pm

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for January 15, 2017 is:

cantankerous • \kan-TANK-uh-rus\  • adjective

: difficult or irritating to deal with

Examples:

"[Kenneth] Lonergan's brow was furrowed, and he was speaking, as he often does, in a low, growling mumble.… Among his theatre and movie-industry peers, he is famous for being famously cantankerous." — Rebecca Mead, The New Yorker, 7 Nov. 2016

"Far from being cantankerous, she says [Roald] Dahl was endlessly ingenious in his desire to amuse, even when mortally ill, and only grumpy when finishing a book." — Elizabeth Gricehow, The Daily Telegraph (London), 12 Nov. 2016

Did you know?

It's irritating, but we're not absolutely sure where cantankerous comes from. Etymologists think it probably derived from the Middle English word contack (or contek), which meant "contention" or "strife." Their idea is that cantankerous may have started out as contackerous but was later modified as a result of association or confusion with rancorous (meaning "spiteful") and cankerous (which describes something that spreads corruption of the mind or spirit). Considering that a cantankerous person generally has the spite associated with contack and rancor, and the noxious and sometimes painful effects of a canker, that theory seems plausible. What we can say with conviction is that cantankerous has been used in English since at least the 1730s.



Categories: Fun Stuff

January 15, 1967: Packers face Chiefs in first Super Bowl

This Day in History - Sat, 01/14/2017 - 11:00pm

On this day in 1967, at the Los Angeles Coliseum, the Green Bay Packers beat the Kansas City Chiefs in the first-ever world championship game of American football.

In the mid-1960s, the intense competition for players and fans between the National Football League (NFL) and the upstart American Football League (AFL) led to talks of a possible merger. It was decided that the winners of each league’s championship would meet each year in a single game to determine the “world champion of football.”

In that historic first game–played before a non-sell-out crowd of 61,946 people–Green Bay scored three touchdowns in the second half to defeat Kansas City 35-10. Led by MVP quarterback Bart Starr, the Packers benefited from Max McGee’s stellar receiving and a key interception by safety Willie Wood. For their win, each member of the Packers collected $15,000: the largest single-game share in the history of team sports.

Postseason college games were known as “bowl” games, and AFL founder Lamar Hunt suggested that the new pro championship be called the “Super Bowl.” The term was officially introduced in 1969, along with roman numerals to designate the individual games. In 1970, the NFL and AFL merged into one league with two conferences, each with 13 teams. Since then, the Super Bowl has been a face-off between the winners of the American Football Conference (AFC) and the National Football Conference (NFC) for the NFL championship and the coveted Vince Lombardi Trophy, named for the legendary Packers coach who guided his team to victory in the first two Super Bowls.

Super Bowl Sunday has become an unofficial American holiday, complete with parties, betting pools and excessive consumption of food and drink. On average, 80 to 90 million people are tuned into the game on TV at any given moment, while some 130-140 million watch at least some part of the game. The commercials shown during the game have become an attraction in themselves, with TV networks charging as much as $2.5 million for a 30-second spot and companies making more expensive, high-concept ads each year. The game itself has more than once been upstaged by its elaborate pre-game or halftime entertainment, most recently in 2004 when Janet Jackson’s infamous “wardrobe malfunction” resulted in a $225,000 fine for the TV network airing the game, CBS, and tighter controls on televised indecency.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Francois de La Rochefoucauld

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 01/14/2017 - 6:00pm
"He who lives without folly isn't so wise as he thinks."
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Oscar Wilde

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 01/14/2017 - 6:00pm
"Biography lends to death a new terror."
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Dan Quayle

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 01/14/2017 - 6:00pm
"People that are really very weird can get into sensitive positions and have a tremendous impact on history."
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Dwight D. Eisenhower

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 01/14/2017 - 6:00pm
"I can think of nothing more boring for the American people than to have to sit in their living rooms for a whole half hour looking at my face on their television screens."
Categories: Fun Stuff