Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - December 19 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Fri, 12/19/2014 - 6:00pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - December 19

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Fri, 12/19/2014 - 6:00pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Number Master
   Can you determine the four digit code?
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Voltaire

Quotes of the Day - Fri, 12/19/2014 - 6:00pm
"Indeed, history is nothing more than a tableau of crimes and misfortunes."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Michel de Montaigne

Quotes of the Day - Fri, 12/19/2014 - 6:00pm
"I prefer the company of peasants because they have not been educated sufficiently to reason incorrectly."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Philip Guedalla

Quotes of the Day - Fri, 12/19/2014 - 6:00pm
"Autobiography is an unrivaled vehicle for telling the truth about other people."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Russell Baker

Quotes of the Day - Fri, 12/19/2014 - 6:00pm
"Usually, terrible things that are done with the excuse that progress requires them are not really progress at all, but just terrible things."
Categories: Fun Stuff

syncretic

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Fri, 12/19/2014 - 12:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for December 19, 2014 is:

syncretic • \sin-KRET-ik\  • adjective
: characterized or brought about by a combination of different forms of belief or practice

Examples:
Dr. Portman practices a syncretic form of medicine, borrowing from both Eastern and Western medical traditions.

"Her CV cites disparate accomplishments as a scientist, writer, and artist—and teacher…. Moreover, her career arc represents a syncretic impulse that characterizes her general outlook on life." — Glen Martin, Forbes, November 4, 2014

Did you know?
Syncretic has its roots in an ancient alliance. It's a descendant of the Greek word synkrētismos, meaning "federation of Cretan cities"—syn- means "together, with," and Krēt- means "Cretan." The adjective first appeared in English in the mid-19th century, and the related noun syncretism debuted over 200 years earlier. Syncretic retains the idea of coalition and appears in such contexts as "syncretic religions," "syncretic societies," and even "syncretic music," all describing things influenced by two or more styles or traditions. The word also has a specific application in linguistics, where it refers to a fusion of inflectional forms.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - December 18

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Thu, 12/18/2014 - 11:50pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

Can you find anagrams of the words below?

The initial letters of the new words also form an anagram.

Can you find the final word, which is related to the word QUESTION.

BRUISE
WARNED
PLEASE
LISTEN
VEINED
TRANCE

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - December 18 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Thu, 12/18/2014 - 11:50pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - December 18

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Thu, 12/18/2014 - 11:50pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Battle Shift
   Battle a shape-shifting shadow creature against the clock.
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

December 19, 1998: President Clinton impeached

This Day in History - Thu, 12/18/2014 - 11:00pm

After nearly 14 hours of debate, the House of Representatives approves two articles of impeachment against President Bill Clinton, charging him with lying under oath to a federal grand jury and obstructing justice. Clinton, the second president in American history to be impeached, vowed to finish his term.

In November 1995, Clinton began an affair with Monica Lewinsky, a 21-year-old unpaid intern. Over the course of a year and a half, the president and Lewinsky had nearly a dozen sexual encounters in the White House. In April 1996, Lewinsky was transferred to the Pentagon. That summer, she first confided in Pentagon co-worker Linda Tripp about her sexual relationship with the president. In 1997, with the relationship over, Tripp began secretly to record conversations with Lewinsky, in which Lewinsky gave Tripp details about the affair.

In December, lawyers for Paula Jones, who was suing the president on sexual harassment charges, subpoenaed Lewinsky. In January 1998, allegedly under the recommendation of the president, Lewinsky filed an affidavit in which she denied ever having had a sexual relationship with him. Five days later, Tripp contacted the office of Kenneth Starr, the Whitewater independent counsel, to talk about Lewinsky and the tapes she made of their conversations. Tripp, wired by FBI agents working with Starr, met with Lewinsky again, and on January 16, Lewinsky was taken by FBI agents and U.S. attorneys to a hotel room where she was questioned and offered immunity if she cooperated with the prosecution. A few days later, the story broke, and Clinton publicly denied the allegations, saying, "I did not have sexual relations with that woman, Ms. Lewinsky."

In late July, lawyers for Lewinsky and Starr worked out a full-immunity agreement covering both Lewinsky and her parents, all of whom Starr had threatened with prosecution. On August 6, Lewinsky appeared before the grand jury to begin her testimony, and on August 17 President Clinton testified. Contrary to his testimony in the Paula Jones sexual-harassment case, President Clinton acknowledged to prosecutors from the office of the independent counsel that he had had an extramarital affair with Ms. Lewinsky.

In four hours of closed-door testimony, conducted in the Map Room of the White House, Clinton spoke live via closed-circuit television to a grand jury in a nearby federal courthouse. He was the first sitting president ever to testify before a grand jury investigating his conduct. That evening, President Clinton also gave a four-minute televised address to the nation in which he admitted he had engaged in an inappropriate relationship with Lewinsky. In the brief speech, which was wrought with legalisms, the word "sex" was never spoken, and the word "regret" was used only in reference to his admission that he misled the public and his family.

Less than a month later, on September 9, Kenneth Starr submitted his report and 18 boxes of supporting documents to the House of Representatives. Released to the public two days later, the Starr Report outlined a case for impeaching Clinton on 11 grounds, including perjury, obstruction of justice, witness-tampering, and abuse of power, and also provided explicit details of the sexual relationship between the president and Ms. Lewinsky. On October 8, the House authorized a wide-ranging impeachment inquiry, and on December 11, the House Judiciary Committee approved three articles of impeachment. On December 19, the House impeached Clinton.

On January 7, 1999, in a congressional procedure not seen since the 1868 impeachment trial of President Andrew Johnson, the trial of President Clinton got underway in the Senate. As instructed in Article 1 of the U.S. Constitution, the chief justice of the U.S. Supreme Court (William Rehnquist at this time) was sworn in to preside, and the senators were sworn in as jurors.

Five weeks later, on February 12, the Senate voted on whether to remove Clinton from office. The president was acquitted on both articles of impeachment. The prosecution needed a two-thirds majority to convict but failed to achieve even a bare majority. Rejecting the first charge of perjury, 45 Democrats and 10 Republicans voted "not guilty," and on the charge of obstruction of justice the Senate was split 50-50. After the trial concluded, President Clinton said he was "profoundly sorry" for the burden his behavior imposed on Congress and the American people.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Bill Watterson

Quotes of the Day - Thu, 12/18/2014 - 6:00pm
"Careful. We don't want to learn from this."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Anatole France

Quotes of the Day - Thu, 12/18/2014 - 6:00pm
"The average man, who does not know what to do with his life, wants another one which will last forever."
Categories: Fun Stuff

George Price

Quotes of the Day - Thu, 12/18/2014 - 6:00pm
"Correct me if I'm wrong, but hasn't the fine line between sanity and madness gotten finer?"
Categories: Fun Stuff

Samuel Goldwyn

Quotes of the Day - Thu, 12/18/2014 - 6:00pm
"I had a monumental idea this morning, but I didn't like it."
Categories: Fun Stuff

oxymoron

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Thu, 12/18/2014 - 12:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for December 18, 2014 is:

oxymoron • \ahk-sih-MOR-ahn\  • noun
: a combination of contradictory or incongruous words; broadly : something (such as a concept) that is made up of contradictory or incongruous elements

Examples:
"That's an oxymoron!" said Joanne, when she heard the DJ describe the song as an "instant classic."

"A 'healthy snack' sounds like an oxymoron. The two words seem to be on opposite ends. But that does not have to be the case." — Karen Miller, The Boston Banner, October 23, 2014

Did you know?
The Greeks exhaustively classified the elements of rhetoric, or effective speech and writing, and gave the name oxymōron, literally "pointed foolishness," to the deliberate juxtaposing of seemingly contradictory words. The roots of oxymoron, oxys meaning "sharp" or "keen" and mōros meaning "foolish," are nearly antonyms themselves, making oxymoron nicely self-descriptive. Oxymoron originally applied to a meaningful paradox condensed into a couple of words, as in "precious bane," "lonely crowd," or "sweet sorrow." Today, however, oxymoron can also refer to unintentional contradictions, like "a plastic glass."

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - December 17

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Wed, 12/17/2014 - 11:37pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

What is represented by this BrainBat?

ENO ERAUQS OT

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - December 17 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Wed, 12/17/2014 - 11:37pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - December 17

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Wed, 12/17/2014 - 11:37pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Click Drag 1
   Click it, drag it, solve it!
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

December 18, 1620: Mayflower docks at Plymouth Harbor

This Day in History - Wed, 12/17/2014 - 11:00pm

On December 18, 1620, the British ship Mayflower docked at modern-day Plymouth, Massachusetts, and its passengers prepared to begin their new settlement, Plymouth Colony.

The famous Mayflower story began in 1606, when a group of reform-minded Puritans in Nottinghamshire, England, founded their own church, separate from the state-sanctioned Church of England. Accused of treason, they were forced to leave the country and settle in the more tolerant Netherlands. After 12 years of struggling to adapt and make a decent living, the group sought financial backing from some London merchants to set up a colony in America. On September 6, 1620, 102 passengers–dubbed Pilgrims by William Bradford, a passenger who would become the first governor of Plymouth Colony–crowded on the Mayflower to begin the long, hard journey to a new life in the New World.

On November 11, 1620, the Mayflower anchored at what is now Provincetown Harbor, Cape Cod. Before going ashore, 41 male passengers–heads of families, single men and three male servants–signed the famous Mayflower Compact, agreeing to submit to a government chosen by common consent and to obey all laws made for the good of the colony. Over the next month, several small scouting groups were sent ashore to collect firewood and scout out a good place to build a settlement. Around December 10, one of these groups found a harbor they liked on the western side of Cape Cod Bay. They returned to the Mayflower to tell the other passengers, but bad weather prevented them from docking until December 18. After exploring the region, the settlers chose a cleared area previously occupied by members of a local Native American tribe, the Wampanoag. The tribe had abandoned the village several years earlier, after an outbreak of European disease. That winter of 1620-1621 was brutal, as the Pilgrims struggled to build their settlement, find food and ward off sickness. By spring, 50 of the original 102 Mayflower passengers were dead. The remaining settlers made contact with returning members of the Wampanoag tribe and in March they signed a peace treaty with a tribal chief, Massasoit. Aided by the Wampanoag, especially the English-speaking Squanto, the Pilgrims were able to plant crops–especially corn and beans–that were vital to their survival. The Mayflower and its crew left Plymouth to return to England on April 5, 1621.

Over the next several decades, more and more settlers made the trek across the Atlantic to Plymouth, which gradually grew into a prosperous shipbuilding and fishing center. In 1691, Plymouth was incorporated into the new Massachusetts Bay Association, ending its history as an independent colony.

Categories: Fun Stuff