Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - October 21

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - 4 hours 51 min ago
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

The legendary BrainBashers calendar has had a small problem.

Here is a listing showing the number of days in each month:

January    73
February   83
March      51
April      52
May        31
June       42
July       41
August     63
September  ==?==

Using the same rules, how many days are in September?

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - October 21 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - 4 hours 51 min ago
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - October 21

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - 4 hours 51 min ago
BrainBashers Daily Game

Fat Slice
   Slice up shapes by dragging your mouse through them.
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

BrainBashers RSS Feed - Unsubscribe?

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - 4 hours 51 min ago
To unsubscribe from the BrainBashers RSS feed please view the notes on BrainBashers.
Categories: Fun Stuff

redux

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - 22 hours 46 min ago

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for October 21, 2014 is:

redux • \ree-DUKS\  • adjective
: brought back

Examples:
Now running in his own campaign, the son of the former mayor was advised to develop his own identity and not simply portray himself as his father redux.

"Think of it as 'Combat Evolved' redux. 'Destiny' wants to meld the multiplayer and single-player experience into a coherent whole." — Gieson Cacho, San Jose Mercury News, September 16, 2014

Did you know?
In Latin, redux (from the verb reducere, meaning "to lead back") can mean "brought back" or "bringing back." The Romans used redux as an epithet for the Goddess Fortuna with its "bringing back" meaning; Fortuna Redux was "one who brings another safely home." But it was the "brought back" meaning that made its way into English. Redux belongs to a small class of English adjectives that are always used postpositively—that is, they always follow the words they modify. Redux has a history of showing up in titles of English works, such as John Dryden’s Astraea Redux (a poem "on the happy restoration and return of his sacred majesty, Charles the Second"), Anthony Trollope’s Phineas Redux, and John Updike’s Rabbit Redux.

Categories: Fun Stuff

October 21, 1959: Guggenheim Museum opens in New York City

This Day in History - Mon, 10/20/2014 - 11:00pm

On this day in 1959, on New York City's Fifth Avenue, thousands of people line up outside a bizarrely shaped white concrete building that resembled a giant upside-down cupcake. It was opening day at the new Guggenheim Museum, home to one of the world's top collections of contemporary art.

Mining tycoon Solomon R. Guggenheim began collecting art seriously when he retired in the 1930s. With the help of Hilla Rebay, a German baroness and artist, Guggenheim displayed his purchases for the first time in 1939 in a former car showroom in New York. Within a few years, the collection—including works by Vasily Kandinsky, Paul Klee and Marc Chagall—had outgrown the small space. In 1943, Rebay contacted architect Frank Lloyd Wright and asked him to take on the work of designing not just a museum, but a "temple of spirit," where people would learn to see art in a new way. 

Over the next 16 years, until his death six months before the museum opened, Wright worked to bring his unique vision to life. To Wright's fans, the museum that opened on October 21, 1959, was a work of art in itself. Inside, a long ramp spiraled upwards for a total of a quarter-mile around a large central rotunda, topped by a domed glass ceiling. Reflecting Wright's love of nature, the 50,000-meter space resembled a giant seashell, with each room opening fluidly into the next.

Wright's groundbreaking design drew criticism as well as admiration. Some felt the oddly-shaped building didn't complement the artwork. They complained the museum was less about art and more about Frank Lloyd Wright. On the flip side, many others thought the architect had achieved his goal: a museum where building and art work together to create "an uninterrupted, beautiful symphony." 

Located on New York's impressive Museum Mile, at the edge of Central Park, the Guggenheim has become one of the city's most popular attractions. In 1993, the original building was renovated and expanded to create even more exhibition space. Today, Wright's creation continues to inspire awe, as well as odd comparisons—a Jello mold! a washing machine! a pile of twisted ribbon!—for many of the 900,000-plus visitors who visit the Guggenheim each year.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Jules Renard

Quotes of the Day - Mon, 10/20/2014 - 7:00pm
"Literature is an occupation in which you have to keep proving your talent to people who have none."
Categories: Fun Stuff

J. Robert Oppenheimer

Quotes of the Day - Mon, 10/20/2014 - 7:00pm
"Any man whose errors take ten years to correct is quite a man."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Lenin

Quotes of the Day - Mon, 10/20/2014 - 7:00pm
"A lie told often enough becomes the truth."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Friedrich Nietzsche

Quotes of the Day - Mon, 10/20/2014 - 7:00pm
"Only sick music makes money today."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - October 20

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Mon, 10/20/2014 - 6:40pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

The results for a recent Chess tournament between five close rivals is described below:

Dave finished before Adam.
Eileen finished after Betty.
Adam finished before Charlie.
Eileen finished after Dave.
Betty finished before Adam.
Dave finished after Betty.
Charlie finished before Eileen.

Who finished where?

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - October 20 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Mon, 10/20/2014 - 6:40pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - October 20

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Mon, 10/20/2014 - 6:40pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Common Answers
   Compete with the rest of the world by predicting the most common answers to 10 easy questions.
[Played on the BrainBashers Puzzle/Illusion website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

impunity

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Mon, 10/20/2014 - 1:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for October 20, 2014 is:

impunity • \im-PYOO-nuh-tee\  • noun
: exemption or freedom from punishment, harm, or loss

Examples:
Penalties for breaking the law can be made harsher, but without extra funding for its enforcement, people will continue to violate it with impunity.

"Carlos Zarate, a congressman who sits on the Philippine House of Representatives' Human Rights Committee, said in an interview Tuesday that the arrest of General Palparan did not signal an end to the problem of security forces committing abuses with impunity." — Floyd Whaley, The New York Times, August 13, 2014

Did you know?
Impunity (like the words pain, penal, and punish) traces to the Latin noun poena, meaning "punishment." The Latin word, in turn, came from Greek poinē, meaning "payment" or "penalty." People acting with impunity have prompted use of the word since the 1500s, as in this 1660 example by Englishman Roger Coke: "This unlimited power of doing anything with impunity, will only beget a confidence in kings of doing what they list [desire]." While royals may act with impunity more easily than others, the word impunity can be applied to the lowliest of beings as well as the loftiest: "Certain beetles have learned to detoxify [willow] leaves in their digestive tract so they can eat them with impunity" (Smithsonian, September 1986).

Categories: Fun Stuff

October 20, 1947: Congress investigates Reds in Hollywood

This Day in History - Sun, 10/19/2014 - 11:00pm

On October 20, 1947, the notorious Red Scare kicks into high gear in Washington, as a Congressional committee begins investigating Communist influence in one of the world's richest and most glamorous communities: Hollywood.

After World War II, the Cold War began to heat up between the world's two superpowers—the United States and the communist-controlled Soviet Union. In Washington, conservative watchdogs worked to out communists in government before setting their sights on alleged "Reds" in the famously liberal movie industry. In an investigation that began in October 1947, the House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC) grilled a number of prominent witnesses, asking bluntly "Are you or have you ever been a member of the Communist Party?" Whether out of patriotism or fear, some witnesses—including director Elia Kazan, actors Gary Cooper and Robert Taylor and studio honchos Walt Disney and Jack Warner—gave the committee names of colleagues they suspected of being communists.

A small group known as the "Hollywood Ten" resisted, complaining that the hearings were illegal and violated their First Amendment rights. They were all convicted of obstructing the investigation and served jail terms. Pressured by Congress, the Hollywood establishment started a blacklist policy, banning the work of about 325 screenwriters, actors and directors who had not been cleared by the committee. Those blacklisted included composer Aaron Copland, writers Dashiell Hammett, Lillian Hellman and Dorothy Parker, playwright Arthur Miller and actor and filmmaker Orson Welles.

Some of the blacklisted writers used pseudonyms to continue working, while others wrote scripts that were credited to other writer friends. Starting in the early 1960s, after the downfall of Senator Joseph McCarthy, the most public face of anti-communism, the ban began to lift slowly. In 1997, the Writers' Guild of America unanimously voted to change the writing credits of 23 films made during the blacklist period, reversing—but not erasing—some of the damage done during the Red Scare.

Categories: Fun Stuff

John Blake

Quotes of the Day - Sun, 10/19/2014 - 7:00pm
"The world tolerates conceit from those who are successful, but not from anybody else."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Alfred Hitchcock

Quotes of the Day - Sun, 10/19/2014 - 7:00pm
"Television has done much for psychiatry by spreading information about it, as well as contributing to the need for it."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Joey Adams

Quotes of the Day - Sun, 10/19/2014 - 7:00pm
"A psychiatrist is a fellow who asks you a lot of expensive questions your wife asks for nothing."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Will Rogers

Quotes of the Day - Sun, 10/19/2014 - 7:00pm
"The more you read and observe about this Politics thing, you got to admit that each party is worse than the other. The one that's out always looks the best."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - October 19

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sun, 10/19/2014 - 6:26pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

What comes next in this sequence:

Hydrogen Helium Lithium Beryllium Boron ==?==

Categories: Fun Stuff