Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - August 2

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - 1 hour 3 min ago
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

Which country is hidden in the paragraph below?

Aliens landed in downtown Chicago last night. Most locals stepped outside to see the space-ship's massive wingspan. Amazingly, seven people failed to see the sight before them, as they took shelter from the bright light that shone from above.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - August 2 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - 1 hour 3 min ago
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - August 2

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - 1 hour 3 min ago
BrainBashers Daily Game

Snail Bob 2
   Snail Bob is back and it's Grandpa's birthday.
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

BrainBashers RSS Feed - Unsubscribe?

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - 1 hour 3 min ago
To unsubscribe from the BrainBashers RSS feed please view the notes on BrainBashers.
Categories: Fun Stuff

brusque

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - 10 hours 24 min ago

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for August 02, 2015 is:

brusque • \BRUSK\  • adjective
1 : markedly short and abrupt 2 : blunt in manner or speech often to the point of ungracious harshness

Examples:
On her first day of work, Diana's new boss gave her only a brusque greeting before showing her the place where she would be working.

"In a brusque statement, Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner would only say Schock's resignation Tuesday is 'a sad day for the people of Illinois and the 18th District.'" — Associated Press, March 17, 2015

Did you know?
We borrowed brusque from French in the 1600s. The French, in turn, had borrowed it from Italian, where it was spelled brusco and meant "tart." And the Italian term came from bruscus, the Medieval Latin name for butcher's-broom, a shrub whose bristly leaf-like twigs have long been used for making brooms. English speakers initially used brusque to refer to a tartness in wine, but the word soon came to denote a harsh and stiff manner—which is just what you might expect of a word bristling with associations to stiff, scratchy brooms.

Categories: Fun Stuff

August 02, 1990: Iraq invades Kuwait

This Day in History - Sat, 08/01/2015 - 11:00pm

At about 2 a.m. local time, Iraqi forces invade Kuwait, Iraq’s tiny, oil-rich neighbor. Kuwait’s defense forces were rapidly overwhelmed, and those that were not destroyed retreated to Saudi Arabia. The emir of Kuwait, his family, and other government leaders fled to Saudi Arabia, and within hours Kuwait City had been captured and the Iraqis had established a provincial government. By annexing Kuwait, Iraq gained control of 20 percent of the world’s oil reserves and, for the first time, a substantial coastline on the Persian Gulf. The same day, the United Nations Security Council unanimously denounced the invasion and demanded Iraq’s immediate withdrawal from Kuwait. On August 6, the Security Council imposed a worldwide ban on trade with Iraq.

On August 9, Operation Desert Shield, the American defense of Saudi Arabia, began as U.S. forces raced to the Persian Gulf. Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein, meanwhile, built up his occupying army in Kuwait to about 300,000 troops. On November 29, the U.N. Security Council passed a resolution authorizing the use of force against Iraq if it failed to withdraw by January 15, 1991. Hussein refused to withdraw his forces from Kuwait, which he had established as a province of Iraq, and some 700,000 allied troops, primarily American, gathered in the Middle East to enforce the deadline.

At 4:30 p.m. EST on January 16, 1991, Operation Desert Storm, the massive U.S.-led offensive against Iraq, began as the first fighter aircraft were launched from Saudi Arabia and off U.S. and British aircraft carriers in the Persian Gulf. All evening, aircraft from the U.S.-led military coalition pounded targets in and around Baghdad as the world watched the events transpire on television footage transmitted live via satellite from Iraq. Operation Desert Storm was conducted by an international coalition under the supreme command of U.S. General Norman Schwarzkopf and featured forces from 32 nations, including Britain, Egypt, France, Saudi Arabia, and Kuwait.

During the next six weeks, the allied force engaged in an intensive air war against Iraq’s military and civil infrastructure and encountered little effective resistance from the Iraqi air force or air defenses. Iraqi ground forces were helpless during this stage of the war, and Hussein’s only significant retaliatory measure was the launching of SCUD missile attacks against Israel and Saudi Arabia. Saddam hoped that the missile attacks would provoke Israel to enter the conflict, thus dissolving Arab support of the war. At the request of the United States, however, Israel remained out of the war.

On February 24, a massive coalition ground offensive began, and Iraq’s outdated and poorly supplied armed forces were rapidly overwhelmed. By the end of the day, the Iraqi army had effectively folded, 10,000 of its troops were held as prisoners, and a U.S. air base had been established deep inside Iraq. After less than four days, Kuwait was liberated, and the majority of Iraq’s armed forces had either surrendered, retreated to Iraq, or been destroyed.

On February 28, U.S. President George Bush declared a cease-fire, and on April 3 the U.N. Security Council passed Resolution 687, specifying conditions for a formal end to the conflict. According to the resolution, Bush’s cease-fire would become official, some sanctions would be lifted, but the ban on Iraqi oil sales would continue until Iraq destroyed its weapons of mass destruction under U.N. supervision. On April 6, Iraq accepted the resolution, and on April 11 the Security Council declared it in effect. During the next decade, Saddam Hussein frequently violated the terms of the peace agreement, prompting further allied air strikes and continuing U.N. sanctions.

In the Persian Gulf War, 148 American soldiers were killed and 457 wounded. The other allied nations suffered about 100 deaths combined during Operation Desert Storm. There are no official figures for the number of Iraqi casualties, but it is believed that at least 25,000 soldiers were killed and more than 75,000 were wounded, making it one of the most one-sided military conflicts in history. It is estimated that 100,000 Iraqi civilians died from wounds or from lack of adequate water, food, and medical supplies directly attributable to the Persian Gulf War. In the ensuing years, more than one million Iraqi civilians have died as a result of the subsequent U.N. sanctions.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - August 1

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sat, 08/01/2015 - 10:14pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

Daft Dave was washing windows on a multi-storey office building when he slipped and fell off his fifty foot ladder, directly onto the concrete pavement below.

Amazingly, he didn't hurt himself at all. How can this be possible?

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - August 1 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sat, 08/01/2015 - 10:14pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - August 1

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Sat, 08/01/2015 - 10:14pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Slider
   Re-order the tiles into the correct sequence.
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

James Thurber

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 08/01/2015 - 7:00pm
"He knows all about art, but he doesn't know what he likes."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Norman Ford

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 08/01/2015 - 7:00pm
"Never try to tell everything you know. It may take too short a time."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Albert Schweitzer

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 08/01/2015 - 7:00pm
"Man is a clever animal who behaves like an imbecile."
Categories: Fun Stuff

Lyndon B. Johnson

Quotes of the Day - Sat, 08/01/2015 - 7:00pm
"If two men agree on everything, you may be sure that one of them is doing the thinking."
Categories: Fun Stuff

skulduggery

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day - Sat, 08/01/2015 - 1:00am

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for August 01, 2015 is:

skulduggery • \skull-DUG-uh-ree\  • noun
: underhanded or unscrupulous behavior; also : a devious device or trick

Examples:
There was a whiff of skulduggery surrounding the real-estate deal, since the building managed to pass inspection even though everyone knew it wasn't up to code.

"Some House Democrats … cast a poor light on the idea of continued backroom negotiations. Rep. Xavier Becerra (D-Calif.), the No. 4 Democratic leader, said the move to extend a possible revote until as late as July 30 was 'shady stuff' and 'underhanded' and held the potential for procedural skulduggery." — Paul Kane and Mike DiBonis, Washington Post, June 16, 2015

Did you know?
Skulduggery, which can also be spelled skullduggery, was first documented in the mid-19th century with the spelling scull-duggery. Etymologists aren't sure exactly how the word arrived in English, but despite the macabre imagery conjured by the word's parts, they do not believe it had anything to do with skulls. It is possibly derived from the now-very-rare sculduddery, a term once used to refer to gross or lewd conduct, but unfortunately the origins of that word are also unknown.

Categories: Fun Stuff

August 01, 1961: Texans head for the thrills at Six Flags

This Day in History - Fri, 07/31/2015 - 11:00pm

On this day in 1961, amusement park lovers “head for the thrills” as Six Flags Over Texas, the first park in the Six Flags chain, opens. Located on 212 acres in Arlington, Texas, the park was the first to feature log flume and mine train rides and later, the first 360-degree looping roller coaster, modern parachute drop and man-made river rapids ride. The park also pioneered the concept of all-inclusive admission price; until then, separate entrance fees and individual ride tickets were the standard. During its opening year, a day at Six Flags cost $2.75 for an adult and $2.25 for a child. A hamburger sold for 50 cents and a soda set the buyer back a dime.

The park, which took a year and $10 million to build, was the brainchild of Texas real estate developer and oilman Angus Wynne Jr., who viewed it as a short-term way to make a buck from some vacant land before turning it into an industrial complex. Wynne reportedly recouped his personal investment of $3.5 million within 18 months and changed his mind about the park’s temporary status. With 17.5 million visitors in its first 10 years, the park became the Lone Star State’s top for-profit tourist attraction. Today, average annual attendance at the park is over 3 million.

One of Six Flags’ unique aspects was that it wasn’t just a random collection of rides; it was developed around a theme: the history of Texas. The park’s name was a nod to the six flags that had flown over the state at various times–France, Spain, Mexico, the Confederacy, Texas and the United States. The park’s rides and attractions were grouped into six themed sections that represented the cultures of these governments and enabled visitors to experience everything from cowboy culture to Southern belles and pirates. Originally, the park was to be called Texas Under Six Flags, before it was decided that Texas should never be under anything.

Angus Wynne sold Six Flags in 1969 and in the coming years, the company expanded and was resold. Today, Six Flags, Inc. is the world’s largest regional theme park company and owns and operates 30 theme, water and zoological parks in North America. In 2005, almost 34 million people spent a combined 250 million hours at Six Flags parks.

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Puzzle - July 31

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Fri, 07/31/2015 - 10:00pm
BrainBashers Daily Puzzle

In the olden days, a man rode into town on his horse. He arrived on Monday, spent six days in town and left on Friday. How is that possible?

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Sudoku - July 31 - Easy

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Fri, 07/31/2015 - 10:00pm
BrainBashers Daily Sudoku



Complete the grid such that every row, every column, and the nine 3x3 blocks contain the digits from 1 to 9.

[Copyright: Kevin Stone]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Daily Game - July 31

BrainBashers - Easy Sudoku - Fri, 07/31/2015 - 10:00pm
BrainBashers Daily Game

Numz
   Find your way to the exit in each of the levels.
[Played on the BrainBashers Games website]

Categories: Fun Stuff

Edgar Watson Howe

Quotes of the Day - Fri, 07/31/2015 - 7:00pm
"A poem is no place for an idea."
Categories: Fun Stuff

E. B. White

Quotes of the Day - Fri, 07/31/2015 - 7:00pm
"I get up every morning determined to both change the world and have one hell of a good time. Sometimes this makes planning my day difficult."
Categories: Fun Stuff