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North Shore Fun

Boundary Waters Blog - Sun, 10/12/2014 - 2:13pm

I’ve been spending quite a bit of time in Grand Marais lately. This weekend there was a homecoming football game on Friday night and dance on Saturday night.  Our house in town was filled to the brim with kids on both nights.  On Saturday night there were over 20 of them at one time for photos. I was happy when Sunday rolled around and we were able to get out of the house and enjoy time outside.

There are so many places to explore around Grand Marais no matter which direction you choose to go.  Today we decided to check out Cut Face Creek since I had never explored there.  There wasn’t much water so Abby’s friend and I walked through the culvert that goes beneath Highway 61, kind of creepy, a little bit wet but lots of fun. We didn’t go too far up the river as Josh and his friend wanted to go fishing at Cascade River.

We got back in the car and headed West to Cascade.  West is the direction people from Grand Marais use to describe what most people refer to as South or towards Duluth, Minnesota.  The kids had fun walking along the river and trying to catch fish but we didn’t see any or catch any.

It didn’t matter to me if we caught fish or not. It was just great to be outside on a gorgeous fall day with 3 fun kids.

fun on Minnesota’s North Shore

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Gunflint Trail Scenic Byway Survey

Boundary Waters Blog - Sat, 10/11/2014 - 11:13am

It’s been a few years since I was on the Gunflint Trail Scenic Byway Committee but that doesn’t mean other people haven’t been working diligently this entire time.  A big thank you to the folks who are continually working on making the Gunflint Trail Corridor an even more special place.  To thank them for their hard work you can participate in the survey they are asking you to complete so they can keep up their wonderful work.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: Ryan Miller
218-529-7552 (direct)
1-800-232-0707 (toll free)
rmiller@ardc.org

Participation Requested in the Gunflint Trail Scenic Byway Survey

(Grand Marais, MN)  The Gunflint Trail Scenic Byway Committee, a sub-committee of the Gunflint Trail Association, is working on an update of the Gunflint Trail National Scenic Byway Corridor Management Plan (CMP).  The purpose of the update will be to acknowledge changes that have occurred since the 2008 plan such as the Gunflint Trail Scenic Byway’s designation as a National Scenic Byway and also to evaluate the progress of goals and strategies identified in the previous plan.

Public input is being requested through participation in the Gunflint Trail Scenic Byway Survey, which asks participants for their input on aspects of the Corridor Management Plan, specifically what they feel are the strengths, weakness, and opportunities of the Gunflint Trail.  The survey will be distributed to members of the Gunflint Trail community and will also be made available at http://www.visitcookcounty.com/communities/gunflint-trail/.  The survey will be open through October 23rd.

The Survey was prepared by the Arrowhead Regional Development Commission (ARDC) on behalf of the Gunflint Trail Scenic Byway Committee.  Results will be collected by ARDC and analyzed by the Gunflint Trail Scenic Byway Committee and included in the Corridor Management Plan update.

The mission of the Gunflint Trail Scenic Byway Committee is to act as advocates and stewards for the preservation, protection, understanding, and maintenance of the natural historic intrinsic values of the Gunflint Trail (Cook County Road #12) and its corridor.  The goal of the Gunflint Trail Scenic Byway Committee is to work with all stakeholders to understand and retain the intrinsic values of the Gunflint Trail corridor for all those who work, live, recreate, and value the area.

For further information on the Gunflint Trail Scenic Byway Survey, please contact Ryan Miller, Associate Planner (218) 529-7552 or rmiller@ardc.org.

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Wilderness Safety 101

Boundary Waters Blog - Fri, 10/10/2014 - 6:40pm

Every day you can find an article where someone has gone missing in a wilderness area. Some are lucky and are found alive while others aren’t so lucky. Is it just luck or is there something that separates the survivors from those who perish?

Being prepared may be one thing that helps those who survive through ordeals of being lost.   Here’s a release from the Minnesota DNR that might just help you be a survivor.

Learn wilderness survival basics before going afield

A missing duck hunter near Mille Lacs Lake forced to spend the night in the woods is a good reminder that anyone spending time outdoors should know wilderness survival basics, said an official with the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.

A recent news release from the Crow Wing County Sheriff’s Office said that 76-year-old Glenn Huff of Garrison had become disoriented while hunting and was unsure of his whereabouts. Rather than wander aimlessly, Huff then “hunkered down with his dog for the night, and at first light started to make his way back to his vehicle.” The following morning Huff and the dog met up with sheriff’s office deputies who reported Huff in excellent condition following the incident.

“That incident is a good reminder that anyone can get lost in the woods, including hunters,” said acting Capt. John Paurus, DNR enforcement education program coordinator.

Panic is an enemy for those who get lost. They should remember the acronym S.T.O.P.

SIT: They should collect their thoughts and realize they are not lost; they just can’t find camp or vehicle.
THINK: What do they have at their disposal both physical and mental that can help them in this situation? Inventory survival kit and start to develop a plan.
OBSERVE: Look around, is there shelter, water, an open area where searchers could see them?
PLAN: Create a plan of action. Pick a spot that to build a fire for heat and signaling. In addition, can the spot provide basic shelter?
A basic survival kit can be packed into a quart zip-lock bag and should contain the following:

Basic shelter materials: Two 55 gallon garbage bags and 30 feet of braided mason’s line.
Means to start a fire: Disposable lighter, waterproof matches or matches stored in a waterproof container, or 10 feet of toilet paper or Petroleum Jelly soaked cotton balls in a waterproof container.
Means of signaling: Whistle, signal mirror (could be an old CD). A fire is also a signal.
Means of knowing direction: A compass.
Comfort food: Food bar, nuts or trail mix.
Anytime people head outdoors they should plan for the unexpected and be prepared to spend the night in the woods. Here are some musts before heading out.

Always let someone know the destination and return plan.
Carry a compass or GPS and know how to use it.
Carry a basic survival and first-aid kit.
Carry a cell phone.
Check the weather and dress for it.
These outdoor safety tips are part of the DNR hunter education firearms safety program. An online study guide for hunters and outdoor enthusiasts is on the DNR website at www.dnr.state.mn.us/safety/firearms/index.html . Click on HunterCourse.

-30-

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Save the Date: Tues, Oct 28 Highway 61 Revisited, Meeting #2

Moving Matters - Fri, 10/10/2014 - 9:20am

Mark your calendars today for the next important opportunity to influence the future of our community with Highway 61! More details to come shortly.

Highway 61 Revisited: Meeting #2
Presentation of Concept Designs for Community Feedback
Tuesday, October 28th 6-8 pm
Bethlehem Lutheran Church, Fellowship Hall
417 1st Ave West, Grand Marais

Want to keep up to date with this project of the City of Grand Marais? Sign-up for the email list and see updates at www.becausemovingmatters.org/highway61.

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A quality of life narrative

Unorganized Territory - Thu, 10/09/2014 - 11:45am

I’ve ended up in a lot of meetings lately, as part of my job and as a citizen.

Right now, the all-important update of the Cook County Comprehensive Land Use Guide is under way. I went to the well-attended meeting at the Cook County Community Center on September 17. I was pleased to see the turnout and even more pleased to see that there was a lot of consensus on issues I care about. I’m looking forward to more discussion about what the county should look like in 15, 20 and 30 years.

There have also been meetings on the Highway 61 corridor as it passes through Grand Marais. Another good-sized crowd turned out at the Grand Marais Public Library recently to share concerns and to talk about possible improvements to the highway to make it safer and more pedestrian and bicycle friendly.

Because of these and the many other meetings I’ve attended recently, I almost passed on the presentation by the University of Minnesota- Morris at North House Folk School on Tuesday, September 23. I had started my day in a county board meeting and had a couple of interviews, so by 6:30 p.m. I was ready to just head home.

But the invitation from Jay Arrowsmith DeCoux about the UM-Morris Center for Small Towns statisticians was intriguing. Jay said he had had some interesting conversation at his B&B with Kelly Asche of the Center for Small Towns.

Jay was excited enough about it to arrange the presentation, so I decided to head to the talk at North House Folk School. I wanted to hear what the university had to say about Grand Marais.

I’m glad I did. The discussion about the “rural narrative” was enlightening. Asche and his co-presenter Jon Bennett talked about the supposed “brain drain” that is occurring in small towns in Minnesota. There is a huge concern about all the young people leaving our rural communities. Asche shared slides with dire newspaper headlines declaring that small towns were dying.

The duo shared statistics that show that is actually far from the truth. Small towns are changing, but they are not dying. In fact, Asche said, in Minnesota only two towns have dissolved in the last 50 years.

The demographics, not the populations, of towns are changing, said Asche. Young people are moving away— most likely to college and to experience the world. But that population is replaced by an older, more stable demographic.

In opposition to the theory that with young people leaving there is a “brain drain,” Asche said the people moving to rural areas bring education, experience and enthusiasm. He said there is actually a “brain gain.”

People who have had their fill of metro-area living are returning to rural life. People with children are moving to the country to raise their children. People are choosing quality of life over high salaries and the “rat race.”

Asche and Bennett had figures and charts to back up their statements. However, their assertion that people move to rural areas because of the quality of life was confirmed— and amplified—by the environment in which they were speaking.

The windows of the lovely “blue building” on the North House campus look out onto the periwinkle blue waters of Lake Superior. As they talked, the sky darkened and became streaked with soft pastels. Eventually it grew dark—until a brief flashing began—the soothing light of the Grand Marais lighthouse

This David R. Johnson photo is a vivid example of why we love to live in Grand Marais.

It was distracting. I zoned out a little bit because of the lighthouse. I started thinking about hikes out to The Point and about ships on the lake. As I blinked and cleared my head to refocus on the presentation, I had to smile. That was exactly Asche’s point.

We are here because even though we must attend meetings, we can do so in such scenic spaces.

Perfect proof for his quality of life argument!

To read the papers and to listen to the news… one would think the country is in terrible trouble. You do not get that impression when you travel the back roads and the small towns do care about their country and wish it well.

Charles Kuralt


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End of Year Gear Sale at Voyageur

Boundary Waters Blog - Thu, 10/09/2014 - 6:47am

Some of you may have received an email in your inbox regarding our end of the year sale.  If not, and you’re interested in deals, then you might want to sign up to receive our “specials” email newsletter.  Just call the office and they can make sure you receive them. 218-388-2224.  We don’t send them out very often but when we do you don’t want to miss them.  I’m not sure what all we have left but I know if you call or email Hannah, Tony, Mark or Ryan will be able to help you out.

See photos and more by clicking on the link below.

Virtual Garage Sale For Our Loyal Customers!
Voyageur Canoe Outfitters

USED COMPLETE OUTFITTING EQUIPMENT PACKAGE
We have created a package with our lightly used gear and a royalex canoe. Included is everything needed for two for your next BWCA or Quetico canoe camping trip! Canoe, tent, pads, sleeping bag, sleeping pad, paddles, cook kit and more for only $1200.00 Shipping available for areas near the twin cities, and possibly Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Iowa or Wisconsin for a small additional charge! Buy Here-Only 5 available.

Featured Used Canoes
This season we have a handful of canoes that we are ready to part with. We have available Royalex canoes, Aluminum canoes, and Lightweight Kevlar canoes in a variety of conditions ready for purchase. Checkout the links below, if you cannot find what you looking for give us a call so we can help you find your dream canoe!

20′ Ultra-Lite Seneca(3 person)
(used for 7 seasons) Good Condition Only $1300

18.5′ Ultra-Lite MN II Canoe
(used for 1 season) Great Condition Only $1600

17′ Ultra-Lite Boundary Waters Canoe
(used for 1 season) Great Condition Only $1600

16′ Ultra-Lite Canak/Kayak
(used for 3 seasons) Great Condition Only $1650

17′ Royalex Spirit II Canoe
(used for 3 seasons) Great Condition Only $500

18.5′ Aluminum Alumacraft Canoe
(2002 canoe) Good Condition Only $500

Winter Guided Lake Trout Fishing Packages

2 Nights in Cozy Winter Accommodations and 1 Day Guided Fishing $399.00 (only 10 packages available)
Purchase Here
Join us for a winter adventure. Arrive in the afternoon or evening for your cabin stay. Get up in the morning and spend the day letting an experienced guide show you how and where to catch BWCA winter lake trout. Retire for the second night to enjoy the warmth of the cabin by the fire with your lake trout dinner. Feel free to use your new skills to fish on your own the third day before heading back to reality!
How it works: Simply purchase one voucher, per lodging unit (1-4 people) now and then call us later to set up your reservation dates for any available time this winter season.

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Favorite Everyday Products: The Magic Bullet

Aging Youthful - Thu, 10/09/2014 - 1:00am

I LOVE my Magic Bullet blender for so many reasons. First is it uber-convenient for mixing up my morning shake; I put in the amount of water I like, add two scoops of my IsaLean protein, add the mixing blade, flip and blend. BOOM, 10 seconds later I have an awesome breakfast on the go after I flip the glass over and remove the mixing blade. I’m all about convenience and not having to wash a lot of dishes as I have lived mechanical dishwasher-less since 2003, when we moved to our cabin.

I also use my Magic Bullet for grinding coffee beans. Yep, no need for another appliance on my limited counter space! I like to grind enough beans to get me through a week and will store in a container in the freezer to keep as fresh as possible. Again, it’s all about making things simple.

While there are recipes that come with the blender, I have to say I haven’t used them. I tried making salsa in it when I first bought it, but I couldn’t figure out the right consistency. I know of moms with babies that will make their own home-made baby food in their magic bullets as they don’t want to serve the commercially canned foods to their babies (read labels…some are loaded with added sugars and other ingredients)

Categories: Member Feeds

Fall is Falling, Art & Music

North Shore Art Scene - Thu, 10/09/2014 - 12:03am

John Sikkila took this gorgeous photo. He calls it Morning in Autumn. 

There are some cool new exhibits in Grand Marais this week, as the season winds down in Cook County.

Cyanotype by Madeline Burton is one of the pieces in the Five Generations exhibit.

First up is the Five Generations  of Arts & Crafts exhibit at the Johnson Heritage Post, which opened with a lively reception last Friday.

The exhibit continues through Nov. 2.

The wide-ranging show includes everything from paintings, fiber art, and jewelry, to encaustic, handmade paper, photography, collages and more crafted by five generations of the Smith-Daley-Ouradnik family.

The show was put together by local encaustic and handmade paper artist Nancy Daley and her two daughters, Jody Ouradnik and Amy Ouradnik, and Nancy’s granddaughter, Madeline Burton.

The Johnson Heritage Post is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday and 1-4 p.m. Sunday and Monday.

The Cross River Heritage Center in Schroeder will close on Saturday, Oct. 18 and re-open for the Holiday Bazaar and Quilt Drawing Nov. 22.

Meanwhile, stop by and see their exhibits, including work by local artists and artisans and the “Ojibwe Faces and Stories: Eastman Johnson Graphic Panels,” the featured exhibit this year. The Heritage Center also has a well-stocked gift shop.

The Heritage Center is open from 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday and from 1-4 p.m. Sunday. It is closed Mondays.

One of the paintings in the Tour d’Art Legacy Exhibit at the Grand Marais Art Colony.

There’s a new exhibit at the Grand Marais Art Colony, too.

Entitled ‘Tour d’Art Home Legacy Exhibit,” the show features work by by four artists on the Legacy Home Tour including Birney Quick, Byron Bradley, Hazel Belvo, Marcia Cushmore, Sharon & Steve Frykman, and Liz Sivertson as well as select students these artists have influenced. The exhibit includes paintings, prints, glass and sculpture. The Art Colony is open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily.

Also this week, an exhibit of paintings created by the Summer Youth Program in Grand Portage entitled “Seven Grandfather Teachings” opens with a reception from 3:30-5:30 p.m. at the Grand Portage Community Center on Friday, Oct. 10. The paintings were facilitated by art therapist, Belle Janicek, who worked with the children to put their ideas on paper and then transfer and paint images on canvas.

Among the Anishinaabe people, The Teachings of the Seven Grandfathers is a set of teachings on human conduct towards others. The exhibit will display seven canvasses: Love, Respect, Wisdom, Truth, Courage, Humility, Honesty.

The public is invited. Refreshments will be served.

In Thunder Bay, the powerful exhibit, “Walking With My Sisters,” continues at the Thunder Bay Art Gallery through Oct 12.

The show is a commemorative art installation for the missing and murdered indigenous women of Canada and the United States, and features more than 1,000 decorated and beaded vamps or moccasin tops arranged in a sacred manner in the gallery space.

For this exhibit, the gallery is open from noon to 8 p.m.(EST)  Tuesday through Thursday and noon to 5 p.m. (EST) Friday through Sunday.

Also, this is the week for Random Acts of Poetry in Thunder Bay. A number of Thunder Bay poets read poetry in a wide variety of venues and places throughout the week, including to the Thunder Bay City Council, at Waterfront Park and at the Farmer’s Market, to name a few.

To catch the word, check out the schedule of appearances here.

In other art news, the Barley Jacks, a roots-bluegrass band, will be on WTIP’s The Roadhouse on Friday night to talk about their music and sing a few tunes. The Roadhouse airs from 5 to 7 p.m.

Saturday is Community Ink Day at the Grand Marais Art Colony. The public is invited to visit the print studio and create a fall-inspired monoprint. The event, which will be held from 1 to 4 p.m. Oct. 11,  is open to all ages and skill levels. No pre-registration is required.

The Cook County Farm & Craft Market will held from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday, too. The market closes for the season next Saturday, Oct. 18. The market is held in the Senior Center parking lot and features a wide variety of arts & crafts as well as baked goods, jams, jellies and pickles and produce in season.

Auditions for “We Happy Few” by Imogen Stubbs, produced by the Grand Marais Playhouse, will be held at the Arrowhead Center for the Arts at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 14.  Performances are Dec. 4-7 and 11-14.  The Playhouse is also seeking a stage manager, light board operator, sound board operator and backstage crew.

Volunteers are also needed to assist with video production and sound editing, and a saxophone player and a pianist  are needed for either live or recorded participation in the production.  Set construction will begin Nov. 8. For more information, call 387-1284 ext. 2.

Life Drawing sessions have begun at the Grand Marais Art Colony. They will be held  from 6:30-9 p.m. on Wednesday nights through through Dec. 10. Open to all artists. Participants must be 18 and older or accompanied/permission by an adult or guardian. Cost is $100 for the entire series or $12 a session. Drop-ins are permitted.

There lots of music this week. Here’s the schedule:

Thursday, Oct. 9:

  • Rich Mattson & Germaine Gemberling, Gunflint Tavern, 7 p.m.

Friday, Oct. 10:

  • Portage Band, American Legion, 6 p.m.
  • Eric Frost, Bluefin Grille, 8 p.m.
  • The Barley Jacks, Gunflint Tavern, 8 p.m.

Saturday, Oct. 11:

  • Eric Frost, Lutsen Resort, 7 p.m.
  • Jim & Michelle Miller, Cascade Lodge Pub, 7:30 p.m.
  • The Barley Jacks, Gunflint Tavern,  8 p.m.
  • Timmy Haus, Papa Charlie’s, 9:30 p.m.
  • Pete Kavanaugh, Bluefin Grille, 8 p.m.

Wednesday, Oct. 12:

  • Open Mic Night, Gunflint Tavern, 5 p.m.
  • Gordon Thorne & Bob Bingham, Bluefin Grille, 8 p.m.

We found some interesting photos this week. Here are a few.

The first snowflakes have fallen Cook County. Here’s a photo by David Johnson to prove it.

David Johnson‘s “A Skiff of Snow.”

 

An eclipse of the full moon could be seen very early Wednesday morning. Bryan Hansel was out there and caught this beauty.

Photo by Bryan Hansel.

 

And we had some wind the other day.

David Johnson‘s “Southwester.”

 

Layne Kennedy caught a calmer moment on Artist’s Point with this shot. His latest blog post, “Turn that Bad Light into Good Light” can be read by clicking here.

“Superior Red Light” by Layne Kennedy.

 

And, of course, we found lots of wonderful fall shots. Let’s start with a close-up of a fall leaf by Travis Novitsky.

Photo by Travis Novitsky.

 

Mary Amerman caught this fleeting view of fall colors in a creative way.

Gunflint Trail by Mary Amerman.

 

Here’s a wonderful shot of Wolf Lake by Paul Sundberg. He said it’s a shot he’s been working on for years and  he finally nailed it this year.

Photo by Paul Sundberg.

 

Christian Dalbec caught this haunting shot of the Cascade River the other day.

Photo by Christian Dalbec.

 

The end of the leaf season can still be gorgeous, however. Paul Pluskwik took this beauty.

 

Photo by Paul Pluskwik.

 

And, finally,  Holly Johnson Beaster took this great shot of a rose blooming at the Rose Garden recently … in fall colors! Enjoy!

Photo by Holly Johnson Beaster.

 

Have a good weekend, everyone!

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10/8/14 - Curt Iverson, from Decorah, Iowa, was the lone camper in the Sawbill Lake Campground last night.

Sawbill Newsletter - Wed, 10/08/2014 - 10:49am

10/8/14 - Curt Iverson, from Decorah, Iowa, was the lone camper in the Sawbill Lake Campground last night. He is enjoying the solitude and the wild beauty of October, in spite of some challenging weather.

Curt was kind enough to share some of his photos with us. - Bill


Campsite #34 is looking pretty cozy. Photo by Curt Iverson.


The view from the Sawbill Lake canoe landing early this morning. Photo by Curt Iverson.


The view from Curt's Wenonah Prism on Sawbill Lake yesterday. Photo by Curt Iverson.

Categories: Member Feeds

Why I Love the BWCA

Boundary Waters Blog - Wed, 10/08/2014 - 9:30am

No phones, no internet, no snap chat, just quality time together in the Boundary Waters.

 

Categories: Member Feeds

Recipe of the Week: Sweet Potato Chips

Aging Youthful - Wed, 10/08/2014 - 1:00am

These are just about the easiest recipe EVER. This is as simple as heating up a pan of coconut oil, peeling sweet potatoes, slicing them thin and frying the sweet potatoes until they are brown and crunchy. If you want to season them, go ahead, but they are great without any seasoning if you ask me. I like to add a little cinnamon and have them as an after dinner treat!

One tip: if you use coconut oil that is “refined” (read the front of the label), it will not have the coconut smell or flavor.

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Stay Awake or Get Up for the Lunar Eclipse

Boundary Waters Blog - Tue, 10/07/2014 - 10:54pm

Sleep is overrated anyway so you may as well stay awake or at the minimum get up early to catch the total lunar eclipse coming to your neighborhood soon.

How to Watch the October 2014 ‘Blood Moon’ Total Lunar Eclipse By Joe Rao, Space.com Skywatching Columnist   |   October 07, 2014 09:00pm ET

Editor’s Update for 3 p.m. ET: It’s almost time for the total lunar eclipse. To see what the weather will be like in your area before Wednesday morning’s eclipse here: Blood Moon Weather Forecast. You can see our complete eclipse coverage here. For photo tips, read: Capturing the Blood Moon: Views from a Lunar Eclipse Photographer (Op-Ed).

The moon will pass through Earth’s shadow early Wednesday morning (Oct. 8) and no enthusiastic skywatcher should ever miss a total eclipse of the moon. The spectacle is often more beautiful and interesting than one would think. During the time when the moon is entering, and later emerging from, Earth’s shadow, some secondary phenomena may be overlooked.

Wednesday’s total lunar eclipse will be visible, weather permitting, from much of North America, as well as to observers in Australia, western Asia and across the Pacific Ocean. As a veteran of 14 eclipses of the moon, I know that to get the best out of a lunar eclipse, you should know the major stages of the event. To help you prepare for the eclipse, here is a step-by-step chronology of some of the things you can expect to see, weather permitting.

 

If you can’t see the total eclipse from your own backyard, you can catch it live online via two webcasts from NASA and the Slooh Community Observatory. The NASA webcast — which will feature a chat with the space agency’s moon experts — begins at 3 a.m. EDT (0700 GMT) on Oct. 8, with Slooh’s starting at 5 a.m. EDT (0900 GMT). You can watch both lunar eclipse webcasts on Space.com, or directly through Slooh and NASA.[How to See the Total Lunar Eclipse (Visibility Maps)]

Wednesday’s lunar eclipse will be followed closely by sunrise for some observers, leading to a rare “selenelion” event. It is also the second of four consecutive total eclipse of the moon (the first occurred last April), and is part of a so-called lunar eclipse tetrad.

Since not every eclipse is the same, it’s possible that not all of these events will occur, but many will. Those who know what to look for have a better chance of seeing it! The chart here lists the times to see the major stages of Wednesday’s eclipse, based on different time zones for North America. The dashes in the chart indicate that the moon has dropped below the horizon and is no longer visible for observers in the designated time zone.

This chart depicts the different stages of the total lunar eclipse of Oct. 8, 2014, and when they will occur based on different time zones. The lunar eclipse will be visible, weather permitting, to observers across North America, the Pacific Ocean and parts of Asia and Australia.
Credit: Joe Rao/Space.com

View full size image

Stages of the total lunar eclipse in Pacific Time:

Stage 1 @ 1:15 a.m. PDT: Moon enters penumbra — The shadow cone of the Earth has two parts: a dark, inner umbra, surrounded by a lighter penumbra. The penumbra is the pale outer portion of the Earth’s shadow. Although the lunar eclipse begins officially at this moment, this is, in essence, an academic event. You won’t see anything unusual happening to the moon — at least not just yet. The Earth’s penumbral shadow is so faint that it remains invisible until the moon is deeply immersed in it. We must wait until the penumbra has reached roughly 70 percent across the moon’s disc to be able to discern the Earth’s shadow. For about the next 40 minutes, the full moon will continue to appear to shine normally, although with each passing minute, it will be progressing ever deeper into the Earth’s outer shadow.

Stage 2 @ 1:56 a.m. PDT: Penumbral shadow begins to appear — Now, the moon has progressed far enough into the penumbra so that it should be evident on the moon’s disc. Start looking for a very light shading to appear on the moon’s upper-left portion. This will become increasingly evident as the minutes pass; the shading will appear to spread and deepen. Just before the moon begins to enter the Earth’s dark umbral shadow, the penumbra should appear as an obvious smudge or tarnishing of the moon’s left portion.

Stage 3 @ 2:14 a.m. PDT: Moon enters the umbra — The moon now begins to cross into the Earth’s dark central shadow, called the umbra. A small, dark scallop shape begins to appear on the moon’s upper-left-hand limb. The partial phases of the eclipse begin, the pace quickens and the change is dramatic. The umbra is much darker than the penumbra and fairly sharp-edged. [Oct. 8 Total Lunar Eclipse Explained (Video)]

As the minutes pass, the dark shadow appears to slowly creep across the moon’s face. At first, the moon’s limb may seem to vanish completely inside of the umbra, but much later, as it moves in deeper, you’ll probably notice it glowing dimly orange, red or brown. Notice also that the edge of the Earth’s shadow projected on the moon is curved. Here is visible evidence that the Earth is a sphere, as deduced by Aristotle from Iunar eclipses he observed in the 4th century B.C. It’s almost as if a dimmer switch were slowly being turned down on the surrounding landscape, as deep shadows of a brilliant moonlit night begin to fade away.

Stage 4 @ 3:07 a.m. PDT: 75-percent coverage — With three-quarters of the moon’s disc now eclipsed, the part of it that is immersed in shadow should begin to light up very faintly, similar to a piece of iron heated to the point where it just begins to glow. It now becomes obvious that the umbral shadow is not complete darkness.

Using binoculars or a small telescope, its outer part is usually light enough to reveal lunar seas and craters, but the central part is much darker, and sometimes no surface features are recognizable. Colors in the umbra vary greatly from one eclipse to the next. Reds and grays usually predominate, but sometimes browns, blues and other tints are encountered.

Stage 5 @ 3:21 a.m. PDT: Less than 5 minutes to totality — Several minutes before (and after) totality — the point at which the moon’s disc is completely eclipsed — the contrast between the remaining pale-yellow sliver and the ruddy-brown coloration spread over the rest of the moon’s disc may produce a beautiful phenomenon sometimes referred to as the “Japanese Lantern Effect.”[How to Photograph the Lunar Eclipse]

Stage 6 @ 3:25 a.m. PDT: Total eclipse begins — When the last of the moon enters the umbra, the total lunar eclipse begins. How the moon will appear during totality is not known. Some eclipses are such a dark gray-black that the moon nearly vanishes from view. At other eclipses, it can glow a bright orange. The reason the moon can be seen at all when it’s totally eclipsed is that sunlight is scattered and refracted around the edge of the Earth by our atmosphere. To an astronaut standing on the moon during totality, the sun would be hidden behind a dark Earth outlined by a brilliant red ring consisting of all the world’s sunrises and sunsets. [Amazing Total Lunar Eclipse Photos of April 2014]

The brightness of this ring around the Earth depends on global weather conditions and the amount of dust suspended in the air. A clear atmosphere on Earth means a bright lunar eclipse. If a major volcanic eruption has injected particles into the stratosphere during the previous couple of years, the eclipse is very dark. As of this writing, three significant volcanic eruptions have occurred pretty recently — Mount Ontake in Japan, Mount Mayon in the Philippines and Mount Bardarbunga in Iceland — so it will be interesting to see if this eclipse will appear a bit darker than normal.

Stage 7 @ 3:55 a.m. PDT: Middle of totality — At this point, the moon is shining anywhere from 10,000 to 100,000 times fainter than it was just a couple of hours ago. Since the moon is moving to the north of the center of the Earth’s umbra, the gradation of color and brightness across the moon’s disc should be such that its lower portion should appear darkest, with hues of deep copper or chocolate brown. Meanwhile, its upper portion — the part of the moon closest to the outer edge of the umbra — should appear brightest, with hues of reds, oranges and even perhaps a soft bluish-white.

Observers away from bright city lights will notice many more stars than were visible earlier in the night. The moon will be in the constellation of Pisces, with the faint planet Uranus positioned roughly a half degree to the moon’s left and readily seen with binoculars. In the eastern United States, the moon will be setting as the sun is rising.

The darkness of the sky is impressive. The surrounding landscape has taken on a somber hue. Before the eclipse, the full moon looked flat and one-dimensional. During totality, however, it will look smaller and three-dimensional, like some weirdly illuminated ball suspended in space.

Before the moon entered the Earth’s shadow, the temperature on its sunlit surface hovered at 266 degrees Fahrenheit (130 degrees C). Since the moon lacks an atmosphere, there is no way that this heat can be stopped from escaping into space as the shadow sweeps by. Now, in shadow, the temperature on the moon has dropped to minus 146 F (minus 99 C) — a drop of 412 F (229 C) in less than 90 minutes!

Stage 8 @ 4:25 a.m. PDT: Total eclipse ends — The emergence of the moon from the shadow begins. The first small segment of the moon begins to reappear, followed again for the next several minutes by the Japanese Lantern Effect.

Stage 9 @ 4:42 a.m. PDT: Seventy-five percent coverage — Any vestiges of coloration within the umbra should be disappearing now. From here on, as the dark shadow methodically creeps off the moon’s disc, it should appear black and featureless. For parts of the Great Lakes, Midwest, Tennessee and Mississippi Valley, the moon will either have set or will be approaching its setting as the sun comes up in the East.

The total lunar eclipse of Oct. 8, 2014 will be visible from a wide area on Earth, as shown in this visibility map from released by Sky & Telescope Magazine.
Credit: Sky & Telescope Magazine

View full size image

Stage 10 @ 5:34 a.m. PDT: Moon leaves umbra — The dark central shadow clears the moon’s right hand (western) limb.

Stage 11 @ 5:51 a.m. PDT: Penumbra shadow fades away — As the last, faint shading vanishes off the moon’s right portion, the visual show comes to an end.

Stage 12 @ 6:33 a.m. PDT: Moon leaves penumbra —The eclipse “officially” ends, as the moon is completely free of the penumbral shadow.

Editor’s Note: If you snap an amazing picture of the Oct. 8 total lunar eclipse, you can send photos, comments and your name and location to managing editor Tariq Malik at spacephotos@space.com.

Joe Rao serves as an instructor and guest lecturer at New York’s Hayden Planetarium. He writes about astronomy for Natural History magazine, the Farmer’s Almanac and other publications, and he is also an on-camera meteorologist for News 12 Westchester, New York. Follow us @Spacedotcom, Facebook and Google+. Original article on Space.com.

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10/7/14 - Gaelynn and Paul Tressler

Sawbill Newsletter - Tue, 10/07/2014 - 4:18pm

10/7/14 - We had a pleasant visit today from longtime Sawbill campers Gaelynn and Paul Tressler and their Cocker Spaniel, Clara. Gaelynn is a well known violinist from Duluth, so she and Sawbill dobro player Bill spent many quiet afternoon hours in the store talking about local musicians, opportunities, and events. - Peter


Paul, Gaelynn, and Bill in front of the Sawbill store.

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Thank you, Arrowhead Cooperative Members!

Arrowhead Electric - Tue, 10/07/2014 - 9:33am


It’s National Cooperative Month and once again we take time to thank the most important part of our cooperative, our members! Stop by our office this week between 8am and 4:30pm for treats, raffles, games, and fun. We’re giving away a freshly baked pie from Moondance Coffee Shop every single day! The big finale on Friday is our annual members’ lunch. Our amazing linemen will be grilling up brats and serving them up with a variety of delicious side dishes and tasty desserts. And don’t forget to check your newsletter this month. There’s a coupon to send in to enter a drawing for $50 off your electric bill. We’ll hold the drawing at the end of the month. 

Thank you for being a part of our cooperative. Every day in our office you can hear someone start a story with “I was talking to the nicest member on the phone today and…” We’re very lucky to work with you. Stop in and say hi this week.

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Brew Crew Team Announced!

Boundary Waters Blog - Mon, 10/06/2014 - 10:34pm

A dream team with experience and passion for the craft will help
launch this new brewery in Grand Marais, MN

GRAND MARAIS, MN, OCT 5 – Owners of Voyageur Brewing Company in Grand Marais, MN, today announced its brewing team. The new production brewery and taproom plans to open in Grand Marais, MN, in early 2015. It will be the first of its kind in the area, and first-year production is expected to exceed 1,000 barrels of locally brewed craft beer using Lake Superior water and local ingredients.

The brewing team is critical to that vision and, thus, Voyageur owners – Mike Prom, Cara Sporn, and Bruce Walters – have spent the past several months in an exhaustive nationwide talent search yielding what they call “the dream team.”

Anders Johansen: Anders Johansen is a relentless innovator whose beer has been poured all over the United States, and he’ll assist Voyageur when the company launches its microbrewery in Grand Marais later this year.

Johansen hails from Deschutes Brewery in Oregon, a brewery most craft beer drinkers know by name. He is a superlative brewer and brewery designer who has developed beers at Deschutes, Pyramid and Ninkasi breweries, among others. From getting new breweries off the ground, designing brewery operations and working on small distillery legislation, Anders brings a tremendous amount of skill and expertise to the Voyageur Brewing team.

Jason Baumgarth: Jason Baumgarth gained his experience in the Duluth area, most recently at Carmody’s Pub. He is a passionate beer creator with an extraordinary palate and a true sense of pub culture. Baumgarth says, “I am really looking forward to crafting excellent beer in Grand Marais and becoming a part of such a great community.”

Craig Nicholls is a founder and owner of TurnKey Consulting Company in Portland, Oregon. Having worked with countless breweries and restaurants, Craig is an expert in organic and sustainable brewing and originator of many standards and practices in his home state. Craig has been a powerful guiding force in the origins of Voyageur Brewing early on. He has helped lay the groundwork for a successful, long-term operation, and will continue to support our growth.

“We are absolutely thrilled with the experience, expertise and passion of this – our dream team,” said Cara Sporn, co-owner of Voyageur Brewing. “We couldn’t be more excited to have everyone on board. Now we can start brewing some signature beer that we know will attract those with a real taste for adventure.”

Voyageur Brewing Company plans to fill eight year-round jobs in 2015. Three flagship beers will always be available, and the brewery plans to offer three seasonals in addition to that once they are at full production. Of course, the final slate of beers will be determined with the help of the recently hired brewing team. Sporn suggests that there will likely be an IPA, a Belgian wheat, and either a stout or porter on tap at all times.

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Bull Moose Visiting

Boundary Waters Blog - Sun, 10/05/2014 - 9:55pm

This morning a bull moose was in our yard checking out the canoe pile.  Of course no one had a camera to snap a photo of it but it is sure fun to see them up close.  I’m not sure if they are in rut yet but if not then they will be soon.

The rut season is the one time of the year you might want to be a little cautious around bulls.  They have been known to act a little goofy and have charged RV’s, police cars and people.  One person we know was charged by a moose and pursued as he ran around and around a tree to keep away from the bull’s antlers.

Here’s a human moose encounter that left one moose cow dead.

Park Service cracks down after photo op kills moose

Posted: Thursday, September 25, 2014 4:30 am

By Mike Koshmrl Jackson Hole Daily |

Grand Teton National Park officials will crack down on wildlife viewing and close part of a campground after a moose died Wednesday after a chaotic encounter.

Hordes of wildlife watchers, safari companies and photographers have flocked to the Gros Ventre Campground in recent weeks to get close-up views of moose during mating season, campers say. The commotion Wednesday morning, coupled with a nearby rutting bull moose, led to a fatal accident for an agitated cow moose, park spokeswoman Jackie Skaggs said Wednesday afternoon.

“It was a pretty dramatic incident,” Skaggs said. “This morning the concentration of people and the heightened excitement of the bull moose pursuing a cow moose caused her to run.

“She stumbled over a picnic table, landed into a fire grate and nearly severed her hind leg,” she said. “Because it was a serious, life-threatening injury, rangers euthanized the female moose.”

The cow left behind a yearling calf, Skaggs said.

“The calf was not injured in the commotion during this crush of people,” she said, “but we’re not sure whether the calf will survive the winter without her mother.”

Idaho resident Anne Huebner, who was staying at the campground, said the calf was bleating for its mother near the bank of the Gros Ventre River after the incident.

Huebner said she was at her campsite when she heard rangers’ gunfire around 8:30 a.m. A retired U.S. Forest Service ranger, Huebner was livid about the behavior of people photographing the moose in recent days.

“First of all, they don’t belong in the campground,” she said of the wildlife photographers, likening them to celebrity paparazzi. “They’re mostly trying to get shots, but they’re all way too close and they’re circling them.

“It’s a real shame that a cow has to be killed because human beings are being total jerks,” Huebner said. “It really breaks my heart to see people behaving like that. I feel sick to my stomach.”

Grand Teton park regulations prohibit people from getting nearer than 25 yards to a moose. The limit is 100 yards for bears and wolves.

The rules aren’t always being followed.

“We’ve had several reports of people getting way too close, even getting within 10 feet of a bull moose,” Skaggs said.

Reports this summer have come in of moose damaging cars and a tent, and charging people, Skaggs said.

After the moose was put down Wednesday, some photographers were antagonistic with rangers, she said.

“Comments were being made that ‘This is public land, and I have a right to be here and you can’t tell me to leave,’ ” Skaggs said.

Problems with wildlife watchers and photographers at Gros Ventre Campground have grown bad enough that authorities will soon close down some roads to give moose space, Skaggs said. Plainclothes law enforcement rangers will also patrol the area to cite those unwilling to police themselves, she said.

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Voyageur Brewing Company Announces Brewing Team

Voyageur Brewing - Sun, 10/05/2014 - 2:29pm

A dream team with experience and passion for the craft will help
launch this new brewery in Grand Marais, MN

GRAND MARAIS, MN, OCT 5 – Owners of Voyageur Brewing Company in Grand Marais, MN, today announced its brewing team. The new production brewery and taproom plans to open in Grand Marais, MN, in early 2015. It will be the first of its kind in the area, and first-year production is expected to exceed 1,000 barrels of locally brewed craft beer using Lake Superior water and local ingredients.

The brewing team is critical to that vision and, thus, Voyageur owners – Mike Prom, Cara Sporn, and Bruce Walters – have spent the past several months in an exhaustive nationwide talent search yielding what they call “the dream team.”

Anders Johansen: Anders Johansen is a relentless innovator whose beer has been poured all over the United States, and he’ll assist Voyageur when the company launches its microbrewery in Grand Marais later this year.  

Johansen hails from Deschutes Brewery in Oregon, a brewery most craft beer drinkers know by name. He is a superlative brewer and brewery designer who has developed beers at Deschutes, Pyramid and Ninkasi breweries, among others. From getting new breweries off the ground, designing brewery operations and working on small distillery legislation, Anders brings a tremendous amount of skill and expertise to the Voyageur Brewing team.

Jason Baumgarth: Jason Baumgarth gained his experience in the Duluth area, most recently at Carmody’s Pub. He is a passionate beer creator with an extraordinary palate and a true sense of pub culture. Baumgarth says, “I am really looking forward to crafting excellent beer in Grand Marais and becoming a part of such a great community.”

Craig Nicholls is a founder and owner of TurnKey Consulting Company in Portland, Oregon. Having worked with countless breweries and restaurants, Craig is an expert in organic and sustainable brewing and originator of many standards and practices in his home state. Craig has been a powerful guiding force in the origins of Voyageur Brewing early on. He has helped lay the groundwork for a successful, long-term operation, and will continue to support our growth.

“We are absolutely thrilled with the experience, expertise and passion of this – our dream team,” said Cara Sporn, co-owner of Voyageur Brewing. “We couldn’t be more excited to have everyone on board. Now we can start brewing some signature beer that we know will attract those with a real taste for adventure.”

Voyageur Brewing Company plans to fill eight year-round jobs in 2015. Three flagship beers will always be available, and the brewery plans to offer three seasonals in addition to that once they are at full production. Of course, the final slate of beers will be determined with the help of the recently hired brewing team. Sporn suggests that there will likely be an IPA, a Belgian wheat, and either a stout or porter on tap at all times.

Contact: Sue Prom

Voyageur Brewing Company

When you can’t drink our beer, quench your thirst online.
Find us on Facebook
Follow us on Twitter

sue@voyageurbrewing.com

 

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Autumn Days at Chik-Wauk

Chik-Wauk Museum and Nature Center Blog - Sun, 10/05/2014 - 12:47pm


Golden tamaracks lining the Chik-Wauk Museum and Nature Center driveway mean autumn is upon us and the 2014 museum season is quickly drawing to a close. Be sure to visit and catch this year’s temporary exhibit on Butterflies, Skippers, and Moths of the Gunflint Trail before we lock up our doors for the winter months at 5 p.m. on Sunday, October 19th. (Until then, we’re open every single day from 10 a. m. -  5 p.m.)

As you drive up to the museum, you might notice large flocks of brown birds along the Gunflint Trail roadside. These are Lapland Longspurs, making their way to their southerly wintering grounds. Soon the longspurs will be replaced by snow buntings and not too long after that, the snow will fly in earnest.  Here’s a nice photo of the Chik-Wauk bay in its autumn colors to distract you from the ever-approaching winter.

While you’re at the museum, get a head start on your holiday shopping with our gift shop sale, offering up to 40% off select items.

Sunday, October 19 is the final day the museum will be open this year. After that, you’ll have to wait until May 23, 2015 to visit and see the 2015 temporary exhibit, “The Gunflint Trail’s Paper Trail” featuring brochures, diaries, correspondence, and other paper items that originated on the Gunflint Trail.

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10/5/14 - Snow on the Wenonahs...

Sawbill Newsletter - Sun, 10/05/2014 - 9:51am

10/5/14 - Farmers used to note the first snow on the pumpkins. Here at Sawbill, we celebrate the first snow on the Wenonahs.


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